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AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch ziet, third-person singular present of zien, whence Afrikaans sien.

VerbEdit

siet (present siet, present participle siende, past participle gesiet)

  1. (dialectal) Alternative form of sien

AragoneseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin septem.

NumeralEdit

siet

  1. seven

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin septem.

NumeralEdit

siet

  1. seven

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from Proto-Finno-Ugric *čijɜ- (to run) + -t (instantaneous verb-forming suffix).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃiʲɛt]
  • Hyphenation: si‧et

VerbEdit

siet

  1. (intransitive) to hurry
  2. (intransitive) to be fast (of clock or watch: ahead of the correct time)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

With verbal prefixes

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #111 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *sh₂ey- (or *sēy-), past sēju from an unchanged *sēy-, some dialects also have present seju from a short *sey-, otherwise present sienu from a no-stem with *ey > ie shift. Iterative saistīt (to link) via ablaut.[1]

VerbEdit

sìet tr., 1st conj., pres. sienu, sien, sien, past sēju

  1. to bind

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “siet”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Middle DutchEdit

ZhuangEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Chinese (MC siuᴇt̚).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

siet (old orthography siet)

  1. (dialectal) snow
    Synonym: nae