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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alteration of dialectal spattle (by association with spit (noun)), from Old English spātl, which is related to spǣtan (whence spit (verb)).

NounEdit

spittle (countable and uncountable, plural spittles)

  1. Spit, usually frothy and of a milky coloration.
  2. Something frothy and white that resembles spit.
  3. Spit-up or drool of an infant.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

spittle (countable and uncountable, plural spittles)

  1. (now archaic) Alternative form of spital
    • (Can we date this quote?), George Herbert, The Thanksgiving:
      I'll build a spittle, or mend common ways []

Etymology 3Edit

Representing a frequentative form of spit (a spade's depth), equivalent to spit +‎ -le.

NounEdit

spittle (countable and uncountable, plural spittles)

  1. A small sort of spade.

VerbEdit

spittle (third-person singular simple present spittles, present participle spittling, simple past and past participle spittled)

  1. To dig or stir with a small spade.

AnagramsEdit