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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French syndic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

syndic (plural syndics)

  1. A government official, a magistrate, especially one of the Chief Magistrates of Geneva.
    • 1923, The Thousand Nights and One Night, translated by Powys Mathers:
      ‘To-morrow, after the midday prayer, mount an ass and make for the Habbānīyah quarter and there enquire for the house of the syndic Barakah, known as Abū Shāmah.’
  2. (law) An agent of a corporation, or of any body of people engaged in a business enterprise; an advocate or patron; an assignee.
    In France, syndics are appointed by the creditors of a bankrupt to manage the property.
    The University of Cambridge has its syndics, who are chosen from the senate to transact special business, such as the regulation of fees, the framing of laws, etc.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin syndicus (delegate of a corporation), from Ancient Greek σύνδικος (súndikos, defendant’s advocate), from συν- (sun-) + the base of δίκη (díkē, judgement).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɛ̃dik/
  • (file)

NounEdit

syndic m (plural syndics)

  1. a syndic

Further readingEdit