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See also: Tester

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EnglishEdit

 
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A tester (canopy) above a pulpit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɛstə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛstə(r)

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Old French testre, from Latin testa.

NounEdit

tester (plural testers)

  1. A canopy over a bed.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, III.13:
      And I could as hardly spare my gloves as my shirt, or forbeare washing of my hands both in the mornng and rising from the table, or lye in a bed without a testerne and curtaines about it, as of most necessary things.
    • Walpole
      No testers to the bed, and the saddles and portmanteaus heaped on me to keep off the cold.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. […]  The bed was the most extravagant piece.  Its graceful cane half tester rose high towards the cornice and was so festooned in carved white wood that the effect was positively insecure, as if the great couch were trimmed with icing sugar.
  2. Something that overhangs something else; especially a canopy or soundboard over a pulpit.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 11:
      With our shaggy jackets drawn about our shoulders, we now passed the Tomahawk from one to the other, till slowly there grew over us a blue hanging tester of smoke, illuminated by the flame of the new-lit lamp.

Etymology 2Edit

 
A vacuum tube tester

From test +‎ -er.

NounEdit

tester (plural testers)

  1. A person who administers a test.
  2. A device used for testing.
  3. (Australia, slang, obsolete) A punishment of 25 lashes (strokes of a whip) across a person′s back.[1]
  4. A sample of perfume available in a shop for customers to try before they buy.
  5. (cycling) A cyclist who focuses on success in time trials.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

For testern, teston, from French teston, from Old French teste (the head, the head of the king being impressed upon the coin). See tester (a covering), and compare testone, testoon.

NounEdit

tester (plural testers)

  1. An old French silver coin.
  2. (Britain, slang, dated) A sixpence.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1987,Robert Hughes, The Fatal Shore, 1996, paperback, →ISBN, Chapter 12.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

test +‎ -er

VerbEdit

tester

  1. to test
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin testor.

VerbEdit

tester

  1. (law) to write one's will

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

tester m

  1. indefinite plural of test

VerbEdit

tester

  1. present of teste

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

tester

  1. indefinite plural of test