Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: testá and tèsta

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin testa.

NounEdit

testa (plural testas or testae or testæ)

  1. (botany) A seed coat.
    The testa develops from the tissue, the integument, originally surrounding the ovule.
    • 1840, James Scott Bowerbank, A History of the Fossil Fruits and Seeds of the London Clay, page 30,
      The seeds are furnished with a reticulated testa, very much in appearance like that of the seeds of two closely-allied pericarps in the cabinet of my friend Mr. Ward, of Wellclose-square, the names of which I have been unable to obtain, but which present strong evidence of belonging to the Malvaceæ.
    • 1969, C. W. Bennett, Seed Transmission of Plant Viruses, Alison Smith, Advances in Virus Research, Volume 14, page 224,
      In tests with the Lincoln and Virginia varieties of cowpea, Crowley (1959) found that, in plants infected with bean southern mosaic virus before blossoming, the virus was present in nearly 100% of the testae and endosperms of seeds of both varieties, but could not be detected in the embryos.
    • 1977, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australian Journal of Plant Physiology, page 354,
      Thus, two conditions must be satisfied for the testas to have this effect: contact between the testas and the radicle, and the presence of at least half of the testas.
    • 2005, D. W. Dickson, D. De Waele, Nematode Parasites of Peanut, Michel Luc, Richard A. Sikora, John Bridge, Plant Parasitic Nematodes in Subtropical and Tropical Agriculture, page 419,
      A.[Aphelenchoides] arachidis is a parasite of pods, testae, roots and hypocotyls, but not the cotyledons, embryos or other parts of the plant (Bos, 1977a; Bridge et al., 1977).
    • 2007, J. Smartt, Evolution of American Phaseolus beans under domestication, Peter John Ucko, G. W. Dimbleby (editors), The Domestication and Exploitation of Plants and Animals, page 458,
      One of the most remarkable features of cultivated beans is the enormous range of testa colours and patterns which can be found.
  2. (marine biology) The external calciferous shell, or endoskeleton, of an echinoderm; the test.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

testa

  1. third-person singular past historic of tester

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛs.ta/, [ˈt̪ɛs̪t̪ä]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛsta
  • Stress: tèsta
  • Hyphenation: te‧sta

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin testa.

NounEdit

testa f (plural teste)

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
  1. head
  2. (anatomy) head (of a bone)
SynonymsEdit
  • (part of the body): capo
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Non-lemma forms.

VerbEdit

testa

  1. third-person singular present indicative of testare
  2. second-person singular imperative of testare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

testa f (genitive testae); first declension

  1. a piece of burned clay, brick, tile
  2. (transf.) a piece of baked earthenware
    1. an earthen pot, pitcher, jug, urn
    2. a sherd, potsherd
    3. a piece of bone
    4. ostracon (= ὄστρακον (óstrakon))
    5. the shell of shellfish or of testaceous animals, shellfish, skull
  3. a sort of clapping with the flat of the hands (as if with two tiles), in token of applause, invented by Nero

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative testa testae
genitive testae testārum
dative testae testīs
accusative testam testās
ablative testā testīs
vocative testa testae

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • testa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • testa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “testa”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • testa” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • testa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • testa in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • testa in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ testa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  2. ^ Partridge, Origins: A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

testa m

  1. genitive singular form of tests

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

testa

  1. simple past of teste
  2. past participle of teste

Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testa.

NounEdit

testa f (oblique plural testas, nominative singular testa, nominative plural testas)

  1. head

PortugueseEdit

 
testa

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese testa, from Latin testa.

NounEdit

testa f (plural testas)

  1. forehead (part of the face above the eyebrows and below the hairline)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

testa

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of testar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of testar

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testa (pot).

NounEdit

testa f (plural testas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) head

Usage notesEdit

In Rumantsch Grischun, the literary standard language, testa is used in the figurative sense, and chau in the anatomical sense. Usage differs somewhat, however, between dialects.

SynonymsEdit


SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testa (brick).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /t̪ʲɛs(ʃ)ta/
  • Hyphenation: te‧sta

NounEdit

testa f (plural testi)

  1. (anatomy) head
  2. intelligent person
  3. intelligence

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin testa.

NounEdit

testa f (plural testas)

  1. head
  2. test (shell or endoskeleton of an echinoderm)

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of testar.

VerbEdit

testa

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of testar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of testar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of testar.
Derived termsEdit

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

testa (present testar, preterite testade, supine testat, imperative testa)

  1. try, attempt; to see if a specific action is possible; also to see if a device works properly.

ConjugationEdit