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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French thermal, from New Latin *thermalis, from Ancient Greek θέρμη (thérmē, heat), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (to heat, warm).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thermal (plural thermals)

  1. (meteorology) A column of rising air in the lower atmosphere created by uneven heating of Earth's surface.

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AdjectiveEdit

thermal (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to heat or temperature.
    • 2013 May-June, Charles T. Ambrose, “Alzheimer’s Disease”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 200:
      Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems—surgical foam, a thermal gel depot, a microcapsule or biodegradable polymer beads.
  2. (fabric) Providing efficient insulation so as to keep the body warm.
  3. Caused, brought about by heat.
  4. (stone) Having a rough finish by treatment with a blow-torch.

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VerbEdit

thermal (third-person singular simple present thermals, present participle thermaling or thermalling, simple past and past participle thermaled or thermalled)

  1. (stone) To create a rough finish on stone by treating it with a high-temperature blow-torch.
  2. (gliding, often in the present participle) To fly an unpowered aircraft in a (thermal) column of rising air.

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Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

thermal (feminine singular thermale, masculine plural thermaux, feminine plural thermales)

  1. thermal

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

thermal (not comparable)

  1. thermal

Related termsEdit