EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English warm, werm, from Old English wearm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, with different proposed origins:

  1. Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot), related to Ancient Greek θερμός (thermos), Latin formus, Sanskrit घर्म (gharma).
  2. Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to burn), related to Hittite (warnuzi) [Cuneiform?] and to Old Church Slavonic варити (variti).

The dispute is due to differing opinions on how initial Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰ- evolved in Germanic: some think that *gʷʰ would have turned to *b, and that the root *gʷʰer- would instead have given rise to burn etc. Some have also proposed a merger of the two roots.

The term is cognate with West Frisian waarm, Dutch/German/Low German warm, Danish/Norwegian/Swedish varm and Icelandic varmur.

AdjectiveEdit

warm (comparative warmer, superlative warmest)

  1. Having a temperature slightly higher than usual, but still pleasant; mildly hot.
    The tea is still warm.
    This is a very warm room.
    • Longfellow
      Warm and still is the summer night.
    • 1985, Robert Ferro, Blue Star
      It seemed I was too excited for sleep, too warm, too young.
  2. Caring and friendly, of relations to another person.
    We have a warm friendship.
  3. Having a color in the red-orange-yellow part of the visible electromagnetic spectrum.
  4. Close, often used in the context of a game in which "warm" and "cold" are used to indicate nearness to the goal.
    • Black
      Here, indeed, young Mr. Dowse was getting "warm", as children say at blindman's buff.
  5. (archaic) Ardent, zealous.
    a warm debate, with strong words exchanged
    • Milton
      Mirth, and youth, and warm desire!
    • Alexander Pope
      Each warm wish springs mutual from the heart.
    • Addison
      They say he's a warm man and does not care to be made mouths at.
    • Hawthorne
      I had been none of the warmest of partisans.
    • 1776, Edward Gibbon, The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Chapter 1
      To the strength and fierceness of barbarians they added a contempt for life, which was derived from a warm persuasion of the immortality and transmigration of the soul.
  6. (archaic) Being well off as to property, or in good circumstances; rich.
    • Washington Irving
      warm householders, every one of them
    • Goldsmith
      You shall have a draft upon him, payable at sight: and let me tell you he as warm a man as any within five miles round him.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English werman

VerbEdit

warm (third-person singular simple present warms, present participle warming, simple past and past participle warmed)

  1. (transitive) To make or keep warm.
    • Bible, Isaiah xliv. 15
      Then shall it [an ash tree] be for a man to burn; for he will take thereof and warm himself.
    • Longfellow
      enough to warm, but not enough to burn
  2. (intransitive) To become warm, to heat up.
    My socks are warming by the fire.
    The earth soon warms on a clear summer day.
  3. (intransitive) To favour increasingly.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, The China Governess[1]:
      Mr. Campion appeared suitably impressed and she warmed to him. He was very easy to talk to with those long clown lines in his pale face, a natural goon, born rather too early she suspected.
    He is warming to the idea.
    Her classmates are gradually warming to her.
  4. To become ardent or animated.
    The speaker warms as he proceeds.
  5. To make engaged or earnest; to interest; to engage; to excite ardor or zeal; to enliven.
    • Alexander Pope
      I formerly warmed my head with reading controversial writings.
    • Keble
      Bright hopes, that erst bosom warmed.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

warm (plural warms)

  1. (colloquial) The act of warming, or the state of being warmed; a heating.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dickens to this entry?)
    Shall I give your coffee a warm in the microwave?
StatisticsEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch warm, from Old Dutch warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot) or alternatively *wer- (to burn). Compare Low German warm, West Frisian waarm, German warm, English warm, Danish varm.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

warm (comparative warmer, superlative warmst)

  1. warm, hot
  2. (meteorology, officially) 20 °C or more

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot) or alternatively *wer- (to burn). Compare Low German warm, Dutch warm, English warm, West Frisian waarm, Danish varm.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

warm (comparative wärmer, superlative am wärmsten)

  1. warm, hot
  2. (dated) homosexual, gay

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DeclensionEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *warmaz, whence also Old Saxon warm, Old English wearm, Old Norse varmr, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐍂𐌼𐍃 (warms). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot) or alternatively *wer- (to burn).

AdjectiveEdit

warm

  1. warm

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *warmaz (warm), whence also Old English wearm, Old Frisian warm, Old High German warm, Old Norse varmr, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐍂𐌼𐍃 (warms). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot) or alternatively *wer- (to burn).

AdjectiveEdit

warm (comparative warmoro, superlative warmost)

  1. warm

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 17:47