See also: wärm and wårm

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English warm, werm, from Old English wearm, from Proto-West Germanic *warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, with different proposed origins:

  1. Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot), related to Ancient Greek θερμός (thermós), Latin formus, Sanskrit घर्म (gharma).
  2. Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to burn), related to Hittite [script needed] (warnuzi) and to Old Church Slavonic варити (variti).

The dispute is due to differing opinions on how initial Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰ- evolved in Germanic: some think that *gʷʰ would have turned to *b, and that the root *gʷʰer- would instead have given rise to burn etc. Some have also proposed a merger of the two roots.

Adjective edit

warm (comparative warmer, superlative warmest)

 
warm colors
  1. Of a somewhat high temperature.
    The tea is still warm.
    This is a very warm room.
    • 1863, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Herons of Elmwood:
      Warm and still is the summer night.
    • 1985, Robert Ferro, Blue Star:
      It seemed I was too excited for sleep, too warm, too young.
  2. Friendly and with affection.
    We have a warm friendship.
  3. Having a color in the part of the visible electromagnetic spectrum between red and yellow-green.
  4. (informal) Close to a goal or correct answer.
    • 1876, William Black, “An Encounter”, in Madcap Violet. [], volume III, London: Macmillan and Co., →OCLC, page 74:
      That was a further clue; and here, indeed, young Mr. Dowse was getting "warm," as children say at blind-man's-buff, although, as a matter-of-fact, she had now been talking of George Miller at all.
  5. Fresh, of a scent; still able to be traced.
  6. (figurative) Communicating a sense of comfort, ease, or pleasantness.
    a warm piano sound
  7. (archaic) Ardent, zealous.
    a warm debate, with strong words exchanged
  8. (archaic, informal) Well off as to property, or in good circumstances; prosperous.
    • 1766, [Oliver Goldsmith], The Vicar of Wakefield: [], volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), Salisbury, Wiltshire: [] B. Collins, for F[rancis] Newbery, [], →OCLC; reprinted London: Elliot Stock, 1885, →OCLC:
      You shall have a draught upon him, payable at sight: and let me tell you he is as warm a man as any within five miles round him.
    • 1791, Charlotte Smith, Celestina, Broadview, published 2004, page 258:
      Mrs. and the Miss Cathcarts began to be considered as people of some consequence in the circle in which they moved, while he gradually obtained in the city the name of a warm man.
    • 1824, Geoffrey Crayon [pseudonym; Washington Irving], Tales of a Traveller, (please specify |part=1 to 4), Philadelphia, Pa.: H[enry] C[harles] Carey & I[saac] Lea, [], →OCLC:
      I know the Stuyvesant family —puff— every one of them —puff— not a more respectable family in the province —puff— old standards —puff— warm householders —puff— none of your upstarts
  9. (archaic) Requiring arduous effort.
    • 1929, The Listener, numbers 41-50, page 552:
      The circular iron platform over there is used in the task of tyring the wheels, a warm job, too, by the way.
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English wierman.

Verb edit

warm (third-person singular simple present warms, present participle warming, simple past and past participle warmed)

  1. (transitive) To make or keep warm.
  2. (intransitive) To become warm, to heat up.
    My socks are warming by the fire.
    The earth soon warms on a clear summer day.
  3. (transitive with to) (sometimes in the form warm up) To favour increasingly.
    He is warming to the idea.
    Her classmates are gradually warming to her.
  4. (intransitive) To become ardent or animated.
    The speaker warms as he proceeds.
  5. (transitive) To make engaged or earnest; to interest; to engage; to excite ardor or zeal in; to enliven.
  6. (transitive) To give emotional warmth to a person.
    • 1886, Joseph Augustus Seiss, Right Life: Or, Candid Talks On Vital Themes:
      That is just the way God tells me this book is His Word. I read it, and it warms me and gives me light.
  7. (transitive, colloquial) To beat or spank.
    • 1945, The Atlantic, volume 176, page 94:
      Not bothering to turn around and not missing a mouthful, Myrtle comforted her with threats of "I'll warm your bottom"; "I'll turn you over to your dad"; "I'll lock you in the truck"; "I'll send for the bogey man" — all of which Darleen ignored []
  8. (transitive, colloquial) To scold or abuse verbally.
  9. (computing, transitive) To prepopulate (a cache) so that its contents are ready for other users.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

warm (plural warms)

  1. (colloquial) The act of warming, or the state of being warmed; a heating.
    Shall I give your coffee a warm in the microwave?

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch warm, from Middle Dutch warm, from Old Dutch warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

warm (attributive warmer, comparative warmste, superlative warmste)

  1. warm
    • 2016, “Dinge Raak Warm”, in Sal Jy Met My Dans?[1], performed by Kurt Darren, South Africa:
      Dinge raak warm.
      Things are getting warm.

Alemannic German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German warm, from Old High German warm. Cognate with German warm, Dutch warm, English warm, Icelandic varmur.

Adjective edit

warm

  1. (Formazza) warm

References edit

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

From English warm.

Pronunciation edit


Adjective edit

warm

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, of person, environment, family) warm (caring and loving)

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch warm, from Old Dutch warm, from Proto-West Germanic *warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, of uncertain origin; derivations from either Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot) or *wer- (to burn) have been proposed.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

warm (comparative warmer, superlative warmst)

  1. warm, hot
    Antonym: koud
  2. (meteorology, officially) 20 °C or more

Inflection edit

Inflection of warm
uninflected warm
inflected warme
comparative warmer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial warm warmer het warmst
het warmste
indefinite m./f. sing. warme warmere warmste
n. sing. warm warmer warmste
plural warme warmere warmste
definite warme warmere warmste
partitive warms warmers

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Afrikaans: warm
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: warum
  • Negerhollands: warm, werm

See also edit

German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German and Old High German warm.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /varm/, [vaʁm], [vaɐ̯m], [vaːm], [ʋ-]
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  • (file)

Adjective edit

warm (strong nominative masculine singular warmer, comparative wärmer, superlative am wärmsten)

  1. warm; mildly hot
    Antonyms: kalt, kühl
  2. (of clothes) warm; keeping the wearer warm
  3. (of rental prices, chiefly adverbial or in compounds) including heating costs, water, and fees (electricity may or may not be included)
    Ich zahle 800 € warm für meine Wohnung.
    I pay €800 for my apartment, including utilities.
  4. (dated, except in warmer Bruder) gay, homosexual (mostly male)
    Synonym: schwul

Usage notes edit

  • German warm means “warm”, but not “feeling warm”; therefore the phrase ich bin warm (literally I am warm) would mean that one’s body has a high temperature, particularly that one’s skin is warm on the outside. The English “I am warm” (that is: I feel warm) is equivalent to German mir ist warm (literally to me it's warm).
  • Although warm (gay) is not in general use, this sense is current enough to make it advisable not to describe the relation between two men as warm (unless the implication is intended).

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • warm” in Duden online
  • warm” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Old Dutch warm, from Proto-West Germanic *warm.

Adjective edit

warm

  1. warm, hot
  2. warm, keeping the wearer warm (of clothes)
  3. warm (of emotions)

Inflection edit

Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite warm warme warm warme
Definite warme warme
Accusative Indefinite warmen warme warm warme
Definite warme
Genitive warms warmer warms warmer
Dative warmen warmer warmen warmen

Alternative forms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English wearm.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

warm (plural and weak singular warme, comparative warmer, superlative warmest)

  1. (temperature) warm, mildly hot
  2. (weather) warm, pleasant, mild
  3. heated, warmed
  4. (locations or garments) having a tendency to be warm; designed to stay warm
  5. Being at a healthy temperature
  6. enthusiastic, vigourous

Descendants edit

References edit

Noun edit

warm

  1. warmness, heat

References edit

Old High German edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *warm.

Adjective edit

warm

  1. warm

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Saxon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *warm (warm).

Adjective edit

warm (comparative warmoro, superlative warmost)

  1. warm

Declension edit




Descendants edit

  • Middle Low German: warm
    • Low German: warm
    • German Low German: warm