See also: Bandit and bändit

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian bandito (outlawed), a derivative of Italian bandire (to ban). The Italian verb is inherited from Vulgar Latin *bannire (to proclaim), but its form was influenced by Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌽𐌳𐍅𐌾𐌰𐌽 (bandwjan, to signal).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbændɪt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bandit (plural bandits)

  1. One who robs others in a lawless area, especially as part of a group.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume II, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), OCLC 630079698, page 173:
      Do you recollect a story my nurse told us of a Sicilian bandit, the terror of the country?—how he saved a young child from a cottage on fire, brought it up delicately, and far removed from his own pursuits; while, at his execution, his chief regret was the future provision for that boy?
  2. An outlaw.
  3. One who cheats others.
  4. (military, aviation) An aircraft identified as an enemy, but distinct from "hostile" or "threat" in that it is not immediately to be engaged.
  5. (sports, slang) A runner who covertly joins a race without having registered as a participant.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bandit (third-person singular simple present bandits, present participle banditing, simple past and past participle bandited)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To rob, or steal from, in the manner of a bandit.
    • 1921, Munsey's Magazine (volume 74, page 38)
      First, she read the bandit news in the paper, and was rather disappointed to learn that her man had evidently taken a night off from banditing. An imitator of the bandit had made an unsuccessful attempt to hold up a drug-store, and had backed out and run when the nervy proprietor reached for a gun; but that was all.
    • 1937, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 160, page 7)
      As the sanctuary was bandited at least once, it may be that the silver wine cups I have are from the treasure.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Funk, W. J. ((Can we date this quote?)) Word origins and their romantic stories, New York: Wilfred Funk, Inc.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bandir.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bandit m (plural bandits, feminine bandida)

  1. outlaw

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bandit m (plural bandits)

  1. bandit
    des procédés de banditdishonest practices

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German: Bandit
    • Polish: bandyta
  • Norman: bandit

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch bandiet, from Middle French bandit, from Italian bandito.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbandɪt̚]
  • Hyphenation: ban‧dit

NounEdit

bandit (first-person possessive banditku, second-person possessive banditmu, third-person possessive banditnya)

  1. bandit
    Synonyms: penjahat, pencuri

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bandit.

NounEdit

bandit m (plural bandits)

  1. (Jersey) bandit

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bandit.

NounEdit

bandit m (plural bandiți)

  1. bandit

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian bandito.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bǎndiːt/
  • Hyphenation: ban‧dit

NounEdit

bàndīt m (Cyrillic spelling ба̀ндӣт)

  1. bandit

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • bandit” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

bandit c

  1. (somewhat dated) a career criminal living outside society; a robber, a bandit

DeclensionEdit

Declension of bandit 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bandit banditen banditer banditerna
Genitive bandits banditens banditers banditernas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit