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See also: Bandit and bändit

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian bandito (outlawed), from Late Latin bannire (to proclaim).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bandit (plural bandits)

  1. One who robs others in a lawless area, especially as part of a group.
  2. An outlaw.
  3. One who cheats others.
  4. (military) An enemy aircraft.
  5. (sports, slang) A runner who covertly joins a race without having registered as a participant.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bandit (third-person singular simple present bandits, present participle banditing, simple past and past participle bandited)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To rob, or steal from, in the manner of a bandit.
    • 1921, Munsey's Magazine (volume 74, page 38)
      First, she read the bandit news in the paper, and was rather disappointed to learn that her man had evidently taken a night off from banditing. An imitator of the bandit had made an unsuccessful attempt to hold up a drug-store, and had backed out and run when the nervy proprietor reached for a gun; but that was all.
    • 1937, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 160, page 7)
      As the sanctuary was bandited at least once, it may be that the silver wine cups I have are from the treasure.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Funk, W. J., Word origins and their romantic stories, New York, Wilfred Funk, Inc.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bandit m (plural bandits)

  1. bandit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch bandiet.

NounEdit

bandit

  1. bandit

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bandit.

NounEdit

bandit m (plural bandits)

  1. (Jersey) bandit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian bandito.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bǎndiːt/
  • Hyphenation: ban‧dit

NounEdit

bàndīt m (Cyrillic spelling ба̀ндӣт)

  1. bandit

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • bandit” in Hrvatski jezični portal