See also: turmă and turmã

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Proto-Norse [Term?] (compare Icelandic tyrma (to overwhelm)). Related to Livvi turmu.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈturmɑ/, [ˈt̪urmɑ]
  • Rhymes: -urmɑ
  • Syllabification: tur‧ma

NounEdit

turma

  1. accident, especially one with casualties

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of turma (Kotus type 10/koira, no gradation)
nominative turma turmat
genitive turman turmien
partitive turmaa turmia
illative turmaan turmiin
singular plural
nominative turma turmat
accusative nom. turma turmat
gen. turman
genitive turman turmien
turmainrare
partitive turmaa turmia
inessive turmassa turmissa
elative turmasta turmista
illative turmaan turmiin
adessive turmalla turmilla
ablative turmalta turmilta
allative turmalle turmille
essive turmana turmina
translative turmaksi turmiksi
instructive turmin
abessive turmatta turmitta
comitative turmineen
Possessive forms of turma (type koira)
possessor singular plural
1st person turmani turmamme
2nd person turmasi turmanne
3rd person turmansa

CompoundsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From turba. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

turma f (genitive turmae); first declension

  1. a troop, squadron of cavalry, team
  2. (in general) a troop, crowd, company, throng, band, body

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative turma turmae
Genitive turmae turmārum
Dative turmae turmīs
Accusative turmam turmās
Ablative turmā turmīs
Vocative turma turmae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Albanian: turmë
  • Ancient Greek: τύρμα (túrma)
  • Aromanian: turmã
  • Friulian: torme

ReferencesEdit

  • turma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • turma in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • turma in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • turma in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • turma in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • turma in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin turma (crowd, company), perhaps a borrowing. Compare Italian torma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

turma f (plural turmas)

  1. a group of people
  2. gang (number of friends)
  3. class (group of students who commenced or completed their education during a particular year)

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:turma.


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈturma/, [ˈt̪urma]

NounEdit

turma f (plural turmas)

  1. testicle
  2. a kind of potato