EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

up- +‎ lift

PronunciationEdit

  • (verb) enPR: ŭplĭftʹ, IPA(key): /ʌpˈlɪft/
  • (adjective, noun) enPR: ŭpʹlĭft, IPA(key): /ˈʌplɪft/
  • (file)
  • (file)

VerbEdit

uplift (third-person singular simple present uplifts, present participle uplifting, simple past and past participle uplifted)

  1. To raise something or someone to a higher physical, social, moral, intellectual, spiritual or emotional level.
    • 2020 April 8, David Clough, “How the West Coast wiring war was won”, in Rail, page 62:
      At the behest of the London Midland Region, the infrastructure was built with a capability for running at up to 110mph with conventional rolling stock, as well as the raising of speed limits - such as the 60mph over Shap summit uplifted to 80mph.
  2. (law, of a penalty) To aggravate; to increase.
    • 2020 January 29, “Transphobic hate crime results in increased sentence for Mold teenager”, in Crown Prosecution Service[1], London: Crown Prosecution Service, retrieved 2020-01-30:
      A man who abused a Police Community Support Officer for being transgender has received an uplifted sentence at Mold Magistrates' Court... At Court the prosecutor applied for the sentence for the public order offence to be uplifted to reflect the hate crime aspect. This resulted in the Court imposing a greater penalty.
  3. (aviation, travel) To be accepted for carriage on a flight.
  4. (New Zealand) To remove (a child) from a damaging home environment by a social welfare organization.
    • 2019 May 9, “Taken by the state: Don't take my baby”, in Stuff:
      In an affidavit supporting an application for a court order to uplift the child, a social worker said there were ongoing family violence issues between the baby's mother and father.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

uplift (plural uplifts)

  1. The act or result of being uplifted.
    • 2019 October, Tony Miles and Philip Sherratt, “EMR kicks off new era”, in Modern Railways, page 58:
      The EMR Regional timetable improvements also include a significant uplift in Sunday services.
    • 2021 February 10, “Network News: Additional funds enable preparatory work for Ashington reopening”, in RAIL, number 924, page 8:
      This means that while initial funding will come from the public purse, landowners along the route will eventually pay back a share of the uplift in land values created by the new line.
  2. (geology) A tectonic upheaval, especially one that takes place in the process of mountain building.
    • 1971, George Finiel Adams, Jerome Wyckoff, Landforms (page 143)
      Recent uplift of the Maine and Oregon coasts has not been enough to "undrown" the larger valleys; the shorelines are still submergent.
  3. (colloquial) A brassiere that raises the breasts.

See alsoEdit

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