Last modified on 28 April 2015, at 14:47

utor

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *oitōr, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *h₃eyt- (to take along, fetch). Compare the future stem οἴσ- (oís-) of Ancient Greek φέρω (phérō, carry).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active ūtor, present infinitive ūtī, perfect active ūsus sum (deponent)

  1. I use, employ.
    • Hasdrubal, Hannibal's brother, when Hannibal failed to invade Rome after his victory at Cannae.
      Vincere scis, Hannibal, victoria uti nescis
      You know how to win, Hannibal, but you do not know how to use your victory
  2. I enjoy, take advantage of.
  3. I experience, undergo, encounter.
  4. I wear.
  5. I consume.

Usage notesEdit

Used with the ablative.

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • utor” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.