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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman valour, from continental valor, valur, valour, from Latin valor. Compare Spanish valor and valer.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvælɚ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ælə(ɹ)

NounEdit

valor (usually uncountable, plural valors) (American spelling)

  1. Value; worth.
  2. Strength of mind in regard to danger; that quality which enables a person to encounter danger with firmness
    Synonyms: bravery, courage, prowess, intrepidity

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin valor, valorem (value), from Latin valeō (I am strong).

NounEdit

valor m (plural valores)

  1. value (numerical quantity measured, assigned or computed)
  2. price; cost
  3. value (quality that renders something desirable or valuable)
  4. value (the degree of importance one gives to something)
  5. courage; bravery
  6. (music) value (the relative duration of a musical note)

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan valor, from Late Latin valōrem, accusative of valor, from Latin valeō.

NounEdit

valor m (plural valors)

  1. value; worth
    • El mes de febrer de 1888, doncs, Eduard Toda ja ha reunit un fons bibliogràfic de valor considerable.
      February 1888, therefore, Eduard Toda set up a bibliographic database of considerable value

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese valor, from Late Latin valōrem, accusative of valor, from Latin valeō (I am strong).

NounEdit

valor m (plural valores)

  1. price; cost
  2. value (quality that renders something desirable or valuable)
  3. value (the degree of importance one gives to something)
  4. value (numerical quantity measured, assigned or computed)
  5. courage; bravery
  6. (music) value (the relative duration of a musical note)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

valor (plural valores)

  1. value (quantity, level)

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin valor, valōrem, from Latin valeō.

NounEdit

valor m (plural valores)

  1. value

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Found in Late Latin, from valeō (I am strong) +‎ -or. Compare with the classical valētūdō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

valor m (genitive valōris); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) value

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative valor valōrēs
Genitive valōris valōrum
Dative valōrī valōribus
Accusative valōrem valōrēs
Ablative valōre valōribus
Vocative valor valōrēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

valor m (oblique plural valors, nominative singular valors, nominative plural valor)

  1. Alternative form of valur

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese valor, from Late Latin valōrem, accusative of valor, from Latin valeō (I am strong).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

valor m (plural valores)

  1. value (numerical quantity measured, assigned or computed)
    O valor de pi é 3,14.
    The value of pi is 3,14.
  2. value (the degree of importance one gives to something)
  3. price; cost
  4. value (quality that renders something desirable or valuable)

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:valor.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • valor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish valor, from Late Latin valōrem, accusative of valor, from Latin valeō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

valor m (plural valores)

  1. value (all senses) (clarification of this definition is needed)
  2. (finance) security
  3. worth
  4. courage

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit