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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French virginal, from Latin virginālis. The musical instrument is probably so called from being played by young girls.

AdjectiveEdit

virginal (comparative more virginal, superlative most virginal)

  1. Being or resembling a virgin.
  2. Uncontaminated or pure.
  3. (zoology) parthenogenetic

TranslationsEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

NounEdit

 
Virginal (instrument)

virginal (plural virginal or virginals)

  1. (music) A musical instrument in the harpsichord family.
    • 1932, Maurice Baring, chapter 16, in Friday's Business[1]:
      His uncle, a Cardinal, engages a Spanish youth of Moorish descent called Diego, an expert singer and player on the virginal, to unlock the secrets of the heart, and to cleanse his bosom of the perilous stuff, and cure him by the spell of his music.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virginal (feminine singular virginale, masculine plural virginaux, feminine plural virginales)

  1. virginal

NounEdit

virginal m (plural virginaux)

  1. virginal

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virginal m or f (plural virginais, comparable)

  1. virginal (relating to virgins)
  2. virgin: immaculate; chaste; untouched

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:virginal.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virginal (plural virginales)

  1. virginal