See also: Virgin

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French virgine, from Latin virginem, accusative of virgō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virgin (plural virgins)

  1. A person who has never had sexual intercourse, or sometimes, one who has never engaged in any sexual activity at all. [from mid-14th c.][1]
  2. (Catholicism, Orthodoxy or historical) Someone vowed to virginity (usually a woman and often a consecrated virgin), or someone who died in defense of their virginity; (especially) one venerated as a saint. [from early 13th c.][2]
    In its list of saints, the Catholic Church classifies St. Agnes, St. Maria Goretti, and St. Thérèse of Lisieux as virgins.
    • 1894, Authorized Report of the Proceedings of the ... Congress of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States ..., page 109:
      This was the relation of the order of virgins to the Church from the latter part of the fourth to the beginning of the seventh century. The modern “sister” had no exact prototype in the Church of the first seven centuries.
    • 1894, John McClintock; James Strong, Cyclopaedia of Biblical, Theological, and Ecclesiastical Literature, page 26:
      The list of saints' days and festivals includes a number of the Romish holidays, properly so called, viz.: Lucian, priest and martyr, Jan. 8 ; Hilary, bishop and confessor, Jan. 13 ; Prisca, virgin and martyr, Jan. 18 ; Fabian, bishop and martyr, Jan. 20 ; Agnes, virgin and martyr, Jan. 21 []
    • 1900, A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church: Second Series, page 366:
      It is evident that those from the priesthood are chiefly taken from the order of virgins, or if not from virgins, at least from monks; or if not from the order of monks, then they are wont to be made priests who keep themselves from their wives [] .
    • 1994, Susanna Elm, `Virgins of God' : The Making of Asceticism in Late Antiquity: The Making of Asceticism in Late Antiquity, Clarendon Press, →ISBN, page 174:
      It ought to have become apparent, however, that the well-established order of widows was the model for the newly developing order of virgins. Both orders earned their legitimization from the way of life adopted by their members []
    • 2007, Todd C. Penner; Caroline Vander Stichele, Mapping Gender in Ancient Religious Discourses, BRILL, →ISBN, page 89:
      According to Jerome's account, a young man, who desired to seduce a consecrated virgin of the church, at first attempted to do so through the standard means of seduction: namely, “with touching, jokes, nods, whistles, and the rest” (Vit. Hil. 21.2670–75).
    • 2015, Anonymous; Aeterna Press, The Life and Miracles: Saint Philomena, Virgin and Martyr, Aeterna Press:
      Grant, O Lord, I beseech thee, that the Virgin and Martyr, St. Philomena, may solicit thy mercy for us. I implore her intercession, through the merits of her chastity, and by the glory that she gave to thy power, in dying for thee.
  3. (informal) One who has never used or experienced a specified thing.
    I've never eaten tofu before – you could say I'm a tofu virgin.
  4. Any of several species of gossamer-winged butterflies of the family Lycaenidae.
  5. (entomology) A female insect producing eggs from which young are hatched, though there has been no fecundation by a male; a parthenogenetic insect.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virgin (comparative more virgin, superlative most virgin)

  1. (usually not comparable) In a state of virginity; chaste, not having had sexual intercourse.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 7”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Innocence and virgin Modestie [] / That would be woo’d, and not unsought be won
    • 1913, DH Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, Penguin 2006, page 294:
      He was now about twenty-three years old, and, though still virgin, the sex instinct that Miriam had over refined for so long now grew particularly strong.
    • 1988, Hubert Monteilhet, Neropolis:
      From their embraces was born the handsome Actaeon, a naive boy, who had less excuse than other men, given that he was her son, for believing her to be a virgin. It's true that he was even more virgin than his mother.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, page 314:
      Helvidius [] took the plain meaning of scripture to say that Jesus patently had brothers and sisters, so therefore his mother, Mary, had enjoyed a normal family life rather than remaining perpetually virgin.
  2. Of a physical object, untouched.
    • c1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 4 Scene 1.
      The white cold virgin snow upon my heart / Abates the ardour of my liver.
    • 1932, Dorothy L Sayers, Have his Carcase, Chapter 1.
      There is something about virgin sand which arouses all the worst instincts of the detective-story writer. One feels an irresisitible impulse to go and make footprints all over it.
  3. Not yet cultivated, explored, or exploited by humans or humans of certain civilizations.
    virgin prairie, a virgin ecosystem, virgin forest
    virgin clay, i.e. clay that has never been fired
    The virgin lands of the Americas were awaiting the Europeans.
    • 1650, Edward Williams, Virginia: More Especially the South Part Thereof:
      The same bounty of Summer, the same milde remission of Winter, with a more virgin and unexhausted soyle being materiall arguments to shew that modesty and truth receive no diminution by the comparison.
  4. Of olive oil, obtained by mechanical means, so that the oil is not altered.
    • 2013, Cheryl Forberg, Cooking with Quinoa For Dummies, page 62:
      Wondering how some oil is somehow more virgin than regular virgin olive oil can be a real head-scratcher.
  5. (usually not comparable) Of mixed drinks, not containing alcohol.
    a virgin daiquiri

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Virgin. In Oxford English dictionary. Retrieved from https://www-oed-com./view/Entry/223735?rskey=SXSlwu&result=1#eid
  2. ^ Virgin. In Oxford English dictionary. Retrieved from https://www-oed-com./view/Entry/223735?rskey=SXSlwu&result=1#eid

RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin virgō, virginem. Compare the doublet vergură.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virgin m or n (feminine singular virgină, masculine plural virgini, feminine and neuter plural virgine)

  1. virgin, that which has not had sexual intercourse, chaste, maiden, virginal
  2. untouched, clean, stainless, immaculate, pure

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit