See also: WAW

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wawen, waȝien, from Old English wagian (to move, shake, swing, totter), from Proto-Germanic *wagōną (to move), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ- (to drag, carry). Cognate with German wagen (to venture, dare, risk), Dutch wagen (to venture, dare, also to move, stir), Swedish våga (to dare).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

waw (third-person singular simple present waws, present participle wawing, simple past and past participle wawed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To stir; move; wave.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wawe, waȝe, waghe, from Old English wǣg (motion, water, wave, billow, flood, sea), from Proto-West Germanic *wāg, from Proto-Germanic *wēgaz (wave, storm), from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ- (to drag, carry).

Cognate with North Frisian weage (water, wave), German Wag, Woge (wave), French vague (wave), Swedish våg (wave).

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

waw (plural waws)

  1. (obsolete, water) A wave.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English wawe, wowe, waugh, wough, from Old English wāh, wāg (a wall, partition), from Proto-Germanic *waigaz (wall), from Proto-Indo-European *weyk- (to bend, twist). Cognate with Scots wauch, vauch, Saterland Frisian Wooge (indoor wall, partition).

Alternative formsEdit

  • wo (Northern England, Derbyshire)
  • waugh (Scotland)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

waw (plural waws)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, dialectal) A wall.
    • 1678, John Ray, A Collection of English Proverbs, 75:
      She hath been at London to call a strea a straw, and a waw a wall.
    • 1886, Thomas Farrall, Betty Wilson's Cummerland Teals, 41:
      T'ootside waws was whitewesh't.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:wo.

Etymology 4Edit

From Arabic وَاو(wāw).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

waw (plural waws)

  1. The twenty-seventh letter of the Arabic alphabet: و.
  2. Alternative spelling of vav
    • 2006, George Athas, The Tel Dan Inscription: A Reappraisal and a New Introduction, page 147:
      Rather, the waws of both fragments are demonstrably similar. What Cryer and Becking fail to note is that the style of waw used in Fragment B is also used in Fragment A.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IbatanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognates with Yami awaw.

AdjectiveEdit

waw

  1. thirsty

IvatanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognates with Yami awaw.

AdjectiveEdit

waw

  1. thirsty

MapudungunEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

waw (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. A valley.

ReferencesEdit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

waw

  1. Alternative form of wawe

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

waw m (plural waws)

  1. Alternative spelling of uau

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English wagian (wave, undulate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

waw (plural waws)

  1. (water) wave