Last modified on 1 July 2014, at 11:17

canon

See also: cannon, canyon, cañón, cañon, and kanon

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old French canon, from Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קָנֶה (qane, reed)). See also cane.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Canons cast into the top of a bell - used for attaching to a headstock

canon (plural canons)

  1. A generally accepted principle; a rule.
    The trial must proceed according to the canons of law.
    • Shakespeare
      Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst self-slaughter.
  2. A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field.
    (Can we date this quote?) "the durable canon of American short fiction" — William Styron
  3. The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic.
    the entire Shakespeare canon
  4. A eucharistic prayer, particularly the Roman Canon.
  5. A religious law or body of law decreed by the church.
    We must proceed according to canon law.
  6. A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.
  7. In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.
  8. A member of a cathedral chapter; one who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.
  9. A piece of music in which the same melody is played by different voices, but beginning at different times.
    Pachelbel’s Canon has become very popular.
  10. (fandom) Those sources, especially including literary works, which are generally considered authoritative regarding a given fictional universe.
    A spin-off book series revealed the aliens to be originally from Earth, but it's not canon.
  11. (cooking) A rolled and filleted loin of meat.
    a canon of beef or lamb
  12. (printing) The largest size of type with a specific name, formerly used for printing the canons of the church.
  13. ​The part of a bell by which it is suspended; the ear or shank of a bell.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  14. (billiards) A carom.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה (qaneh, reed)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canon m (plural canons, diminutive canonnetje n)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French canon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canon m (plural canons)

  1. cannon, (big) gun
  2. barrel (of firearm)
  3. canon
  4. (music) canon
  5. cannon for a horse.
  6. (religion) canon
  7. (slang) hottie, dish, bombshell (attractive man/woman)
  8. (slang) glass of wine

External linksEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French canon.

NounEdit

canon m (plural canons)

  1. cannon

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard), akin to κάννα (kánna, reed), perhaps from Semitic (compare Hebrew קנה (qaneh, reed)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canōn m (genitive canōnis); third declension

  1. a measuring line
  2. (figuratively) precept, rule, canon
  3. (Ecclesiastical Latin) catalog of sacred writings
  4. (Later Latin) a cannon (artillery)
  5. a yearly tribute paid to the emperor

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative canōn canōnēs
genitive canōnis canōnum
dative canōnī canōnibus
accusative canōnem canōnēs
ablative canōne canōnibus
vocative canōn canōnēs

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

canon m (oblique plural canons, nominative singular canons, nominative plural canon)

  1. tube
  2. cannon
  3. canon

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Greek κανών (kanón), possibly partly through a South Slavic language intermediate.

NounEdit

canon n (plural canoane)

  1. canon
  2. (usually in regards to religion) tenet, dogma, rule, norm, precept
  3. punishment or penance for breaking such a religious rule

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Latin canōn, from Ancient Greek κανών (kanṓn, measuring rod, standard) (compare κάννα (kánna, reed)), perhaps of Semitic origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canon m (plural cánones)

  1. canon (principle, literary works, prayer, religious law, music piece)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit