Last modified on 2 September 2014, at 10:58
See also: leđe

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lede, leode, from Old English lēode (men, people), lēod (man). More at leod.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lede (plural lede)

  1. (Now chiefly UK dialectal, singular) A man; person.
  2. (chiefly UK dialectal, Scotland, collective plural) Men; people, folk.
    • 2012, Yahoo! Canada Answers - Is Jesus God? Did Jesus ever claim to be God?:
      If Jesus were not God, He would have told lede to not worship Him, just as the errand-ghost in Bring to Lightings did.
  3. (UK dialectal, Scotland, singular) A people or nation.
  4. (Now chiefly UK dialectal, plural) Tenements; holdings; possessions.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Mid-20th century neologism from a deliberate misspelling of lead (reverting to its archaic, phonetic spelling – compare Middle English below), intended to avoid confusion with its homograph meaning a strip of type metal used for positioning type in the frame.[1] Compare hed (headline).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lede (plural ledes)

  1. (chiefly US, journalism) The introductory paragraph(s) of a newspaper or other news article.
QuotationsEdit
Usage notesEdit

Usage seems mostly confined to the U.S.[2] Originally only journalistic usage that is now so common in general US English that it is no longer labeled as jargon by major US dictionaries such as Merriam-Webster[3] and American Heritage.[4] Noted as “sometimes spelled” in 1959, “often spelled” in 1969, and asserted in the 1979 reprint of a 1974 book (see Citations page). In 1990, William Safire was still able to say that "lede" was jargon not listed in regular dictionaries.[5][1]

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 WOTD 2000
  2. ^ Current citations in Wiktionary, listed here, are from US sources. The only occurrence found in 2008 on The Guardian website is made by the “editor of Guardian America”, saying “The lede (as we spell it) story in today’s NYT is ...” on his op/ed blog. Other occurrences on .co.uk sites all quote the lead/lede Wikipedia articles.
  3. ^ Lede in Merriam-Webster Online
  4. ^ Lede in the American Heritage Dictionary
  5. ^ Safire 1990: "You will not find this spelling in dictionaries; it is still an insiders' variant, steadily growing in frequency of use. [...] Will lede break out of its insider status and find its way into general use? [...] To suggest this is becoming standard would be misledeing"

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse leiða.

NounEdit

lede c (singular definite leden, not used in plural form)

  1. disgust, distaste, loathing
AntonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See led (disgusting).

AdjectiveEdit

lede

  1. definite of led
  2. plural form of led

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse leiða (to lead).

VerbEdit

lede (imperative led, present leder, past ledede or ledte, past participle ledet or ledt, present participle ledende)

  1. manage, run
  2. head, direct
  3. lead, guide
  4. conduct

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse leita (seek, search)

VerbEdit

lede (imperative led, infinitive at lede, present tense leder, past tense ledte, past participle har ledt)

  1. look
  2. search

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of lijden

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. second-person plural imperative of ler

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. third-person singular indicative present of ledere

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lede (plural ledes)

  1. Alternative form of leod.

VerbEdit

lede

  1. lead

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse leiða, and Danish lede

VerbEdit

lede (imperative led, present tense leder, simple past and past participle leda or ledet, present participle ledende)

  1. to lead
  2. to guide

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

lede

  1. Second-person plural (vós) affirmative imperative of ler

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the nounal use (masculine inflection) of adjective led (evil), in the more original synonym den lede frestaren (the evil tempter)

AdjectiveEdit

lede

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of led.

NounEdit

lede c

  1. the evil one, the loathsome or disgusting one; the devil, Satan