Last modified on 5 December 2014, at 10:10

pus

See also: puss and pūś

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pus, meaning the same.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pus (uncountable)

  1. A whitish-yellow or yellow substance composed primarily of dead white blood cells and dead pyogenic bacteria; normally found in regions of bacterial infection.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Latin puteum. Compare Romanian puț, Italian pozzo.

NounEdit

pus m

  1. well

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pus, meaning the same.

NounEdit

pus m (uncountable)

  1. pus

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin plūs, from Proto-Indo-European *plē-, *pelu- (many).

AdverbEdit

pus

  1. more

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin post

ConjunctionEdit

pus

  1. after

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pus, meaning the same.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pus m (plural pus)

  1. pus

Etymology 2Edit

See pouvoir

VerbEdit

pus

  1. first-person singular past historic of pouvoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of pouvoir

Etymology 3Edit

See paître

VerbEdit

pus

  1. (extremely rare) masculine plural past participle of paître

External linksEdit


GuernésiaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French plus, from Latin plus.

AdverbEdit

pus

  1. more, -er (used to form comparatives of adjectives)

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish bus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pus m (genitive puis, nominative plural pusa)

  1. pout
  2. snout

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pus phus bpus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pus.

NounEdit

pus m (invariable)

  1. pus, matter

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French plus, from Latin.

AdverbEdit

pus

  1. more, -er (used to form comparatives of adjectives)

NounEdit

pus m (plural pus)

  1. (mathematics) plus sign

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

pus

  1. first-person singular preterite of pouver

LatinEdit

NounEdit

pus n (genitive puris)

  1. pus
  2. foul, corrupt matter

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

pus

  1. rafsi of pu'i.

MiskitoEdit

NounEdit

pus

  1. cat

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • pu (Mistralian)

EtymologyEdit

Latin plus.

AdverbEdit

pus

  1. more

PortugueseEdit

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pus, from Proto-Indo-European *pu- (to rot, stink).

NounEdit

pus m (uncountable)

  1. pus

VerbEdit

pus

  1. First-person singular (eu) preterite indicative of pôr
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 234:
      Não pus nada no suco!
      I didn't put anything in the juice!

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Past participle of pune. Probably formed on the basis of the simple perfect, puse, or from a form *post, from Latin postus, from positus. (compare also adăpost, where this was preserved)

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

pus

  1. past participle of pune

DeclensionEdit

See also nepus



SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pus

NounEdit

pus m (plural puses)

  1. pus

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic bus, from Proto-Turkic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pus (definite accusative pusu, plural puslar)

  1. haze

DeclensionEdit


WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin plūs, from Proto-Indo-European *plē-, *pelu- (many).

AdverbEdit

pus

  1. more