Last modified on 5 December 2014, at 03:31

tip

See also: Tip and TİP

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Circa 1225. Not recorded in Old English or Old Norse, but apparently cognate with Dutch tip, East Frisian tip, Danish tip, Swedish tipp. Perhaps cognate with Old English tæppa. Compare Albanian thep (tip, point).

NounEdit

tip (plural tips)

  1. The extreme end of something, especially when pointed; e.g. the sharp end of a pencil. [From 15th c.]
    • 1848, Anne Bronte, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall:
      When he woke up, about half an hour after, he called it to him again, but Dash only looked sheepish and wagged the tip of his tail.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52: 
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. []   But viewed from high up in one of the growing number of skyscrapers in Sri Lanka’s capital, it is clear that something extraordinary is happening: China is creating a shipping hub just 200 miles from India’s southern tip.
    the tip of one's nose
  2. A piece of metal, fabric or other material used to cover the top of something for protection, utility or decoration. [From 15th c.]
    a tip for an umbrella, a shoe, a gas burner, etc.
  3. (music) The end of a bow of a stringed instrument that is not held.
  4. A piece of stiffened lining pasted on the inside of a hat crown.
  5. A thin, boarded brush made of camel's hair, used by gilders in lifting gold leaf.
  6. Rubbish thrown from a quarry.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. (transitive) To provide with a tip; to cover the tip of. [From 15th c.]
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act V:
      I thinke he thinkes vpon the sauage bull: / Tush, feare not man, wee'll tip thy hornes with gold, / And all Europa shall reioyce at thee [...].
    • Hudibras
      truncheon tipped with iron head
    • Thomson
      Tipped with jet, / Fair ermines spotless as the snows they press.

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from Scandinavian, or a special use of Etymology 1.

VerbEdit

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. (transitive) To knock over; to make fall down, to overturn. [From early 14th c.]
  2. (intransitive) To fall over. [From earlier 16th c.]
  3. (intransitive) To be, or come to be, in a tilted or sloping position; to become unbalanced. [From 17th c.]
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick:
      the brief suspended agony of the boat, as it would tip for an instant on the knife-like edge of the sharper waves, that almost seemed threatening to cut it in two [...].
  4. (transitive, slang, dated) To drink. [From 18th c.]
  5. (transitive) To dump (refuse). [From 19th c.]
  6. (US, transitive) To pour a libation, particularly from a forty of malt liquor. [From 20th c.]
  7. (transitive) To deflect with one′s fingers, especially one′s fingertips
    • 2011 September 28, Jon Smith, “Valencia 1 - 1 Chelsea”, BBC Sport:
      Lampard was replaced by Kalou but the substitute immediately gave the ball to Jonas, whose 25-yard curler was tipped wide by Cech.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

tip (plural tips)

  1. (skittles, obsolete) The knocking over of a skittle. [From 17th c.]
  2. An act of tipping up or tilting. [From 19th c.]
  3. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) An area or a place for dumping something, such as rubbish or refuse, as from a mine; a heap (see tipple); a dump. [From 19th c.]
  4. (UK, Australia, New Zealand, by extension) A recycling centre.
  5. (colloquial) A very untidy place. [From 20th c.]
  6. The act of deflecting with one's fingers, especially the fingertips
    • 2011 October 1, Phil McNulty, “Everton 0 - 2 Liverpool”, BBC Sport:
      As a frenetic opening continued, Cahill - whose robust approach had already prompted Jamie Carragher to register his displeasure to Atkinson - rose above the Liverpool defence to force keeper Pepe Reina into an athletic tip over the top.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Of uncertain origin; apparently cognate with Dutch tippen, German tippen, Swedish tippa.

VerbEdit

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. (now rare) To hit quickly and lightly; to tap. [From later 15th c.]
    • Jonathan Swift
      A third rogue tips me by the elbow.

NounEdit

tip (plural tips)

  1. (now rare) A light blow or tap. [From later 16th c.]

Etymology 4Edit

Originally thieves' slang, of uncertain orign.

VerbEdit

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. To give a small gratuity to, especially to an employee of someone who provides a service. [From early 18th c.]
    In some cities waiters must be tipped.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 2, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      Mother [] considered that the exclusiveness of Peter's circle was due not to its distinction, but to the fact that it was an inner Babylon of prodigality and whoredom, from which every Kensingtonian held aloof, except on the conventional tip-and-run excursions in pursuit of shopping, tea and theatres.
  2. (thieves′ slang) To give, pass. [From early 17th c.]
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

tip (plural tips)

  1. A gratuity; a small amount of money left for a bartender, waiter, taxi driver or other servant as a token of appreciation. [From mid-18th c.]
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula:
      A half crown tip put the deputy's knowledge at my disposal, and I learned that Mr. Bloxam [...] had left for his work at five o'clock that morning.
TranslationsEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

Probably from to tip (give, pass) or to tip (tap), or a combination of the two.

NounEdit

tip (plural tips)

  1. A piece of private or secret information, especially imparted by someone with expert knowledge about sporting odds, business performance etc. [From mid-19th c.]
  2. A piece of advice.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tip (third-person singular simple present tips, present participle tipping, simple past and past participle tipped)

  1. To give a piece of private information to; to inform (someone) of a clue, secret knowledge, etc. [From later 19th c.]
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 6Edit

NounEdit

tip (plural tips)

  1. (African American Vernacular) A kick or phase; one's current habits or behaviour.
  2. (African American Vernacular) A particular arena or sphere of interest; a front.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tip m (feminine tipa, masculine plural tips, feminine plural tipes)

  1. full, as in sated or satisfied (including to excess)

NounEdit

tip m (plural tips)

  1. excess (of food or drink)

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tip c (plural tips, diminutive tipje n)

  1. piece of good advice

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

tip

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tippen
  2. imperative of tippen

AnagramsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

tip

  1. rafsi of tikpa.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

French type, Latin typus

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tip m (plural tipifeminine equivalent tipă)

  1. guy

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

tip n (plural tipuri)

  1. prototype, model
  2. type, style

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek τύπος (túpos, mark, impression, type).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tȋp m (Cyrillic spelling ти̑п)

  1. type
  2. (colloquial) person (usually male), guy

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

típ m inan (genitive típa, nominative plural típi)

  1. type

DeclensionEdit


TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tip

  1. type

DeclensionEdit