Last modified on 1 March 2015, at 12:43

toi

See also: tōi, tỏi, tôi, tối, tồi, and toʻi

AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

toi

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tar

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronounEdit

toi

  1. (second-person singular pronoun, oblique case) you, thee

Related termsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: toi
  • Rhymes: -oi
  • IPA(key): [toi]

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

toi

  1. Third-person singular indicative past form of tuoda.

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

toi

  1. (colloquial) Nominative form of tuo.
See alsoEdit

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

toi

  1. You (informal second-person singular personal pronoun).
    • Psalm 71:5:
      Car tu es mon espérance, Seigneur Éternel! En toi je me confie dès ma jeunesse.
      For you are my hope, Eternal Lord! In you I entrust myself since my youth.

SynonymsEdit

QuotationsEdit

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Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

toi

  1. (archaic) second-person singular present tense of togliere

Derived termsEdit

to'

SynonymsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

toi

  1. rōmaji reading of とい

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

toi

  1. Marks the end of a parenthetical clause or phrase, which had been begun with to or to'i.

RafsiEdit

toi

  1. rafsi of troci.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Turkish toy.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

toi n (plural toiuri)

  1. (in the singular, of an action or event) the culminating point
  2. (colloquial) center, heart
  3. scuffle, struggle, scramble
  4. (uncountable) a flock of birds

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit



Samoan Plantation PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Samoan toʻi.

NounEdit

toi

  1. axe

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mühlhäusler, Peter (1983). "Samoan Plantation Pidgin English and the origin of New Guinea Pidgin", in Ellen Woolford and William Washabaugh: The Social Context of Creolization, 28–76.