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Ancient GreekEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Hellenic *-tāts, from Proto-Indo-European *-teh₂ts. Cognate with Sanskrit -ताति (-tāti), and Latin -tās, from which English -ity.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-της (-tēsf (genitive -τητος); third declension (Attic)

  1. Forms nouns representing a state of being
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  • Smyth, Herbert Weir (1920), “Part III: Formation of Words”, in A Greek grammar for colleges, Cambridge: American Book Company, § 840

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Hellenic *-tās (whence also Mycenaean Greek 𐀑𐀴𐀲 (ki-ti-ta /ktitā(s)/, κτίτης)), probably a masculine formation from Proto-Indo-European *-teh₂, feminine of *-tos. Originally used in adjectival compounds, the suffix's narrowing to agentivity may be by analogy to -τήρ (-tḗr) and -τωρ (-tōr).[1]

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-της (-tēsm (genitive -του); first declension

  1. Added to noun stems to form masculine nouns of the person concerned with a thing
  2. Added to verb stems to form masculine agent nouns: -er
  3. Added to place names to form masculine demonyms: -ian
DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, § 267