See also: esse and Esse

Contents

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch -esse, borrowed from Old Northern French -esse, from Late Latin -issa (as in abbātissa ‎(abbess)).[1]

SuffixEdit

-esse

  1. Creates the female form of persons or occupations, as English -ess.
    secretaris ‎(secretary, receptionist) – secretaresse ‎(female secretary, female receptionist)

Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A. van Loey, "Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands", Zutphen, 8. druk, 1970, ISBN 90-03-21170-1; § 180

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French [Term?], from Latin -itiam, the accusative of -itia.

SuffixEdit

-esse

  1. used to form nouns describing the condition of being something (-ness, -ity, etc.)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French -esse, from Old French [Term?], from Late Latin -issa, from Ancient Greek -ισσα ‎(-issa).

SuffixEdit

-esse

  1. -ess (female form)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Derived termsEdit



ItalianEdit

SuffixEdit

-esse

  1. Suffix forming the third-person singular imperfect subjunctive of -ere verbs.

Middle FrenchEdit

SuffixEdit

-esse

  1. -ess (used to form feminine nouns from masculine ones)

Derived termsEdit


DescendantsEdit

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