Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch -eren. Compare also the more native Afrikaans -ers.

Pronunciation

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  • Audio:(file)

Suffix

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-ere

  1. forms the plurals of six nouns
    been (leg; bone) + ‎-ere → ‎beendere (bones)
    gelid (rank) + ‎-ere → ‎geledere (ranks)
    gemoed (mind) + ‎-ere → ‎gemoedere (minds)
    goed (good) + ‎-ere → ‎goedere (goods)
    lied (song; hymn) + ‎-ere → ‎liedere (hymns)
    volk (people) + ‎-ere → ‎volkere (peoples)

Usage notes

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  • In most of the above cases, either the word as such or the plural belongs to a more literary register.
  • The noun blaar (leaf) is a backformation from a plural originally using this suffix (from Dutch blad > bladeren > blaren).

Danish

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Etymology

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Borrowed as part of Latin, French or German verbs. Cognate to French -er, German -ieren, Swedish -era.

Suffix

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-ere

  1. Used in verbs derived from Latin, French or German, indicating the action of doing the first part of the word; such as revolutionere (to revolutionise), from revolution.

References

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Italian

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Latin -ēre (second conjugation).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈe.re/
  • Rhymes: -ere
  • Hyphenation: -é‧re

Suffix

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-ére (verb-forming suffix, first-person singular present -o, first-person singular past historic -étti or (traditional) -ètti, past participle -ùto, auxiliary avére or èssere)

  1. stem, to form the infinitive of some Italian verbs
Conjugation
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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Latin -ere (third conjugation).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /e.re/
  • Hyphenation: -e‧re

Suffix

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-ere (verb-forming suffix)

  1. stem, to form the infinitive of some Italian verbs
Usage notes
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  • See ricevere as an example of a regular -ere verb.
  • There are two groups of irregular -ere verbs:
    • Those in the first group have multiple irregularities (sometimes even in the infinitive), but several related verbs are conjugated in the same way.
    • Those in the second group have irregular past participles and/or, in the past historic have an irregular stem in the first- and third-person singular and the third-person plural.
Conjugation
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  • Identical to above except for the root stress in the infinitive.
Derived terms
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See also

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Etymology 3

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.re/
  • Rhymes: -ɛre
  • Hyphenation: -è‧re

Suffix

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-ere m (noun-forming suffix, plural -eri)

  1. Alternative form of -iere
Usage notes
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  • Used in particular after stems ending in -gn-, e.g. ingegnere.

Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Italic *-ezi, from Proto-Indo-European *-esi, locative case of action nouns, which end in *-os in the nominative. Similar to Ancient Greek -ειν (-ein) < Proto-Hellenic *-ehen, which comes from an alternative locative case form, *-esen.

Note adverbial temere.

Pronunciation

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Suffix

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-ere

  1. present active infinitive of (third conjugation)
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Proto-Italic *-ēzi, in which z changed into r due to rhotacism. Formed by analogy with the short-vowel ending -ere for the Proto-Italic and Latin second conjugation (Etymology 1 above).

Pronunciation

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Suffix

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-ēre

  1. present active infinitive of -eō (second conjugation)

Etymology 3

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Suffix

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-ēre

  1. second-person singular present passive subjunctive of (first conjugation)

Middle Dutch

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Etymology

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From Old Dutch *-āri, -ere, from Proto-Germanic *-ārijaz (masc. agent suffix).

Suffix

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-ere m

  1. Forms agent nouns from verbs.

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Dutch: -er, -aar
  • Limburgish: -er

Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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From Old Norse -era, through Middle High German -ieren, from Old French -ier, from Latin -āre.

Cognate to French -er, German -ieren and Swedish -era.

Suffix

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-ere

  1. Used in verbs derived from Latin, French or German, indicating the action of doing the first part of the word; such as revolusjonere (to revolutionise), from revolusjon (revolution). Equivalent in meaning to English -ize.

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Norse -era, through Middle High German -ieren, from Old French -ier, from Latin -āre.

Cognate to French -er, German -ieren and Swedish -era.

Suffix

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-ere

  1. Used in verbs derived from Latin, French or German, indicating the action of doing the first part of the word. Equivalent in meaning to English -ize.

References

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Old English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *-ārī, from Proto-Germanic *-ārijaz.

Uncertain ultimate origin, usually held to be from Latin -ārius. Gąsiorowski instead suggests that *-ārijaz is a native formation; he derives it from earlier *-azrijaz, which he etymologises as a zero-grade form of *-sōr suffixed with *-ih₂, creating a suffix *-sr-ih₂ for forming feminine agent nouns, which were then masculinised by attaching *-ós. He also suggests a relation to Proto-West Germanic *-astrijā.

Cognate with Old Frisian -ere, Old Saxon -āri, Old High German -āri.

Pronunciation

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Suffix

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-ere

  1. masculine agent suffix, originally applied only to nouns
    Synonyms: -a, -end
    fugol (bird) + ‎-ere → ‎fuglere (fowler)

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Old French

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Alternative forms

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Suffix

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-ere

  1. nominative singular of -or (agent noun suffix)
    Le chanteorli chantere