AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch -eren. Compare also the more native Afrikaans -ers.

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. forms the plurals of six nouns
    been (leg; bone) + ‎-ere → ‎beendere (bones)
    gelid (rank) + ‎-ere → ‎geledere (ranks)
    gemoed (mind) + ‎-ere → ‎gemoedere (minds)
    goed (good) + ‎-ere → ‎goedere (goods)
    lied (song; hymn) + ‎-ere → ‎liedere (hymns)
    volk (people) + ‎-ere → ‎volkere (peoples)

Usage notesEdit

  • In most of the above cases, either the word as such or the plural belongs to a more literary register.
  • The noun blaar (leaf) is a backformation from a plural originally using this suffix (from Dutch blad > bladeren > blaren).

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed as part of Latin, French or German verbs. Cognate to French -er, German -ieren, Swedish -era.

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. Used in verbs derived from Latin, French or German, indicating the action of doing the first part of the word; such as revolutionere (to revolutionise), from revolution.

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin -ēre (second conjugation).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈe.re/
  • Hyphenation: é‧re

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. stem, to form the infinitive of some Italian verbs

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin -ere (third conjugation).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: e‧re

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. stem, to form the infinitive of some Italian verbs

Usage notesEdit

  • See ricevere as an example of a regular -ere verb.
  • There are two groups of irregular -ere verbs:
    • Those in the first group have multiple irregularities (sometimes even in the infinitive), but several related verbs are conjugated in the same way
    • Those in the second group have irregular past participles and/or, in the past historic have an irregular stem in the first- and third-person singular and the third-person plural

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *-ezi, from Proto-Indo-European *-esi, locative case of action noun. Similar to Ancient Greek -ειν (-ein).

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. present active infinitive of (third conjugation)

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

By analogy with short-vowel -ere (Etymology 1 above).

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ēre

  1. present active infinitive of -eō (second conjugation)

Etymology 3Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ēre

  1. second-person singular present passive subjunctive of

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *-āri, -ere, from Proto-Germanic *-ārijaz (masc. agent suffix).

SuffixEdit

-ere m

  1. Forms agent nouns from verbs.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: -er, -aar
  • Limburgish: -er

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse -era, through Middle High German -ieren, from Old French -ier, from Latin -āre.

Cognate to French -er, German -ieren and Swedish -era.

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. Used in verbs derived from Latin, French or German, indicating the action of doing the first part of the word; such as revolusjonere (to revolutionise), from revolusjon (revolution).

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

SuffixEdit

-ere

This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *-ārī, from Proto-Germanic *-ārijaz, from Latin -ārius. Cognate with Old Frisian -ere, Old Saxon -āri, Old High German -āri.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. masculine agent suffix, originally applied only to nouns
    fugol (fowl, bird) + ‎-ere → ‎fuglere (fowler)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ere

  1. nominative singular of -or (agent noun suffix)
    Le chanteorli chantere