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See also: eskimo

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since 1584,[1][2] ultimately from an Old Montagnais term. There are two competing theories: Ives Goddard's theory, accepted by more linguists today, that it derives from ayaškimew (snowshoe-netter), and the older theory, defended by John Steckley, that it derives from a term meaning "eater(s) of raw meat".

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛs.kɪ.moʊ/
  • Hyphenation: Es‧kimo

Proper nounEdit

Eskimo

  1. A group of indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic, from Siberia, through Alaska and Northern Canada, to Greenland, including the Inuit and Yupik.
  2. Any of the languages of the Eskimo.

Usage notesEdit

  • Eskimo has come to be considered offensive, especially in Canada, because it was widely thought to stem from a Cree pejorative meaning “eaters of raw meat”[9][7][8][4][5] (although both the Cree and Inuit ate raw meat).
  • In Canada, it has been superseded by Inuit (for the peoples, and Inuvialuit for those in the Western Arctic). The term is still used worldwide by historians and archaeologists.
  • In Alaska, indigenous Alaskans find this term too imprecise and prefer "Alaska Native", as "Eskimo" encompasses (and is the only encompassing term for) all the Arctic peoples including the Inuit Inupiat and the non-Inuit Yupik. However, Eskimo does not include the related Aleut people (Unangam).
  • Greenland natives also call themselves Greenlanders or Kalaallit, and their language Greenlandic or Kalaallisut.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • husky (dog)
  • Husky (an Eskimo person; an Eskimo language) (dated)

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Eskimo (plural Eskimo or Eskimos)

  1. A member of any of the Eskimo peoples.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Eskimo (comparative more Eskimo, superlative most Eskimo)

  1. Of or relating to the Eskimo peoples.
  2. In, of, or relating to the Eskimo languages.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ in the writings of Richard Hakluyt, in the (now obsolete) spelling Esquimawes (compare French Esquimaux (Eskimos))
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 John Steckley, White Lies about the Inuit (2008)
  3. ^ Ives Goddard, "Synonymy", in Arctic, ed. David Damas, vol. 5 of Handbook of North American Indians (1984), ed. William C. Sturtevant, pages 5–7 (Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution); cited in Lyle Campbell, American Indian Languages: The Historical Linguistics of Native America (1997), page 394 (New York: Oxford University Press)
  4. 4.0 4.1 “Setting the Record Straight About Native Languages: What Does "Eskimo" Mean In Cree?”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[1], Native-languages.org, accessed 2012-06-13
  5. 5.0 5.1 “Eskimo”, in American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition, 2000[2], Bartleby, (Please provide a date or year)
  6. ^ Pamela R. Stern, Historical Dictionary of the Inuit
  7. 7.0 7.1 Jose Mailhot, L'étymologie de «Esquimau» revue et corrigée, Etudes Inuit/Inuit Studies 2-2:59–70 (1978)
  8. 8.0 8.1 Cree Mailing List Digest November 1997
  9. ^ Mark Israel, Eskimo (2012-06-13), archive (2012-04-03)

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French Esquimau; for more, see Eskimo.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

Eskimo n (plural Eskimo's, diminutive Eskimootje n)

  1. Eskimo (person)

Proper nounEdit

Eskimo n

  1. the Eskimo language (group)

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

Eskimo m (plural Eskimos)

  1. an Eskimo

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Eskimo m (genitive Eskimo or Eskimos, plural Eskimo or Eskimos)

  1. an Eskimo