See also: hook and hòòk

EnglishEdit

 
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Proper nounEdit

Hook (countable and uncountable, plural Hooks)

  1. A surname​.
  2. A suburb of Kingston upon Thames borough, Greater London, England.
  3. A large village and civil parish in Hart district, Hampshire, England (OS grid ref SU7254).
  4. A village in Fareham borough, Hampshire, England.
  5. A village near Goole, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.
  6. A village near Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire, England.
  7. A village in Pembrokeshire, Wales.
  8. A rural locality in South Canterbury, Canterbury, New Zealand, on the Hook River.

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

  • According to the 2010 United States Census, Hook is the 2680th most common surname in the United States, belonging to 13437 individuals. Hook is most common among White (90.12%) individuals.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German hôk (corner, angle), from Old Saxon hōk, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz. Compare the sense “small cluster of houses” in cognate Dutch hoek.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Hook m (genitive Hooks or Hookes, plural Höke)

  1. (regional, Westphalia, chiefly in toponyms) a small cluster of farms, often no more than three to five

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • The land shared by a Hook is typically called Esch.

German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German hôk, from Old Saxon hōk, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz. More at hook.

NounEdit

Hook m (plural Hoken)

  1. corner
  2. angle
  3. tip of land; headland; point; foreland