Open main menu

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /huːt/
  • Rhymes: -uːt
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German [Term?], from Old High German huot, from Proto-Germanic *hōdaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to protect). Cognate to Dutch hoed, English hood.

NounEdit

Hut m (genitive Hutes or Huts, plural Hüte, diminutive Hütchen n)

  1. hat (see usage notes)
  2. (of mushrooms) head; top
Usage notesEdit
  • German Hut is typically used of hats from a relatively firm fabric (or other material), with or without a brim, but with no peak. In other words, it is not commonly used of hats that could be called a “cap” (Mütze; Kappe) or “bonnet” (Haube).
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle High German [Term?], from Old High German huota, from Proto-Indo-European *kadh- (to protect).

NounEdit

Hut f (genitive Hut, plural Huten)

  1. protection keeping, care, supervision (often that of a god or other metaphysical being)
    • 1630, Christoph Lehmann, Florilegium politicum[1]:
      Eygene Hut ist die best / das sich ein jeder selbst vorn Unglück / Schaden und Sünden fürsehe.
      Own keeping is the best / may each for himself of bad luck / harm and sin be wary.
    • 1650, Andreas Gryphius, Leo Armenius[2]:
      Wo die verborgnen Schätze / Sind unter deiner Hut.
      Where the hidden treasures / Are under thy [i. e. the devil's] protection.
    • 1780, Friedrich Wilhelm Gotter, Maria Theresia bey ihrem Abschiede von Frankreich[3]:
      Er schützte mich mit unsichtbarer Hut.
      He [i. e. God] protected me with invisible care.
    • 1824, Wilhelm Hauff, Soldatenliebe[4]:
      Sey ruhig, bin in Gottes Hut, / Er liebt ein treu Soldatenblut.
      Be calm, I am in God's care, / He loves a faithful soldier's blood.
    • 1832, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust. Der Tragödie zweiter Teil[5]:
      Dieß vermagst du zu vollenden, / Nimm es, Herr, in deine Hut!
      This you're able to accomplish, / Put it, Lord [i. e. the Great Pan], under your care!
  2. (obsolete, surviving only in one idiomatic expression) guard, ward
    • 1545, Martin Luther, Biblia, das ist, die gantze Heilige Schrifft Deudsch (Isa 21:8)[6]:
      Vnd ein Lewe rieff / HErr / ich stehe auff der Warte jmerdar des tages / vnd stelle mich auff meine Hut alle nacht. (Modernized version: Und wie ein Löwe ruft er: Herr, ich stehe auf der Warte immerdar des Tages und stelle mich auf meine Hut alle Nacht.)
      And he cried, A lion: My lord, I stand continually upon the watchtower in the daytime, and I am set in my ward whole nights.
    Auf der Hut sein.To be on guard.
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Hut, Dutch hoed, English hood.

NounEdit

Hut m (plural Hiet)

  1. hat

PlautdietschEdit

NounEdit

Hut f

  1. skin, hide