Wicca

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A twentieth-century representation of the Old English wiċċa, from Proto-Germanic *wikkô ‎(sorceror). The modern use of the term was introduced first as Wica[1] in Gerald Gardner's Witchcraft Today (1954), as a collective noun ("the Wica") allegedly used as a self-designation by practitioners of witchcraft who initiated him in 1939. The spelling Wicca, again as a collective noun, is first attested in a letter to Gardner from his friend Margaret Bruce, dated 23 February 1960.[2]

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Wicca

  1. A neopagan religion first popularised in 1954 by British civil servant Gerald Gardner, involving the worship of a God and Goddess and the observance of eight Sabbats.

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1954, Gerald Gardner, Witchcraft Today, New York, New York: Magickal Childe, isbn-13 978-0806500027:
  2. ^ Seims, Melissa (2008), "Wica or Wicca? Politics and the Power of Words" in The Cauldron 129.
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