See also: abatré

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Vulgar Latin *abbatere, present active infinitive of *abbatō, *abbatuō, from Latin battuō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

abatre (first-person singular present abato, past participle abatut)

  1. to pull down; knock down, bring down, shoot down (cause to fall down)
  2. to bring down (cause to become unhappy)
  3. to bring down (e.g. an empire, regime)

ConjugationEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Vulgar Latin *abbatere, present active infinitive of *abbatō, *abbatuō, from Latin battuō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

abatre

  1. to knock down; to push down

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *abbatere, present active infinitive of *abbatō, *abbatuō, from Latin battuō.

VerbEdit

abatre

  1. to knock over; to knock down
  2. to destroy; to slaughter
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      Sis chastels fist abatre
      He destroyed six castles
    • circa 1200, Marie de France, Milun:
      Par ire se voldra cumbatre; s’il le puet del cheval abatre, dune sera il en fin honiz.
      By pure anger he wanted to fight; to slay him from his horse, in order to cover him in shame.

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: abattre
  • Norman: abattre
  • Walloon: abate
  • Middle English: abaten