See also: amaró

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian amaro.

NounEdit

amaro (countable and uncountable, plural amari or amaros)

  1. A type of Italian herbal liqueur
    • 2007 June 27, Rob Willey, “A Bit of History, Reborn in a Glass”, in The New York Times[1]:
      At Vessel, in Seattle, the bar manager, Jamie Boudreau, starts his cherry bitters by combining separate bourbon- and rye-based infusions with a touch of honey-flavored vodka and the Italian digestif amaro.
    • 2009 May 24, Michael Bauer, “Adesso salumi is a slice of heaven”, in San Francisco Chronicle[2]:
      In addition, there's a full bar, with some excellent specialty cocktails and a good list of grappa, amari and dessert wines.
    • 2013 July 26, Fritz Hahn, “Football and sightseeing in Richmond”, in Independent Online[3]:
      There are two dozen cocktails and shots, from whiskey punches to tiki-style drinks. (The three-rum old-fashioned should be a summertime classic.) There's a hearty focus on the bitter Italian aperitifs known as amaros.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

amaro

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of amarar

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From amara +‎ -o.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aˈmaro/
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma‧ro
  • Rhymes: -aro

NounEdit

amaro (uncountable, accusative amaron)

  1. bitterness
    • (Can we date this quote?), Valdemar Langlet, “Vojaĝimpresoj”, in Lingvo Internacia:
      mi iris de tie kun doloro kaj amaro en la koro.
      I left with pain and bitterness in my heart.
    • 1955, William Auld, chapter XXV, in La infana raso (kvina eldono):
      mi kredas pri la
      bonvolo de l' homaro,
      ke iam pasos
      kruelo kaj amaro
      I believe in the
      goodwill of humanity,
      that one day will pass
      cruelty and bitterness
    • 1962, Ivan St. Georgien, “101a kanto”, in Provo alfronti la vivon:
      firegno de l' malbelo,
      de l' ploro kaj amaro
      wicked kingdom of ugliness,
      weeping and bitterness
    Synonym: amareco

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French amarre, Italian amarra, Spanish amarra.

NounEdit

amaro (plural amari)

  1. (nautical) hawser, mooring rope/cable
  2. lashing (as for a gun, etc.)

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin amārus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃em-, *h₂eh₃m- (bitter, raw).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aˈma.ro/, [äˈmäːr̺o̞]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aro
  • Hyphenation: a‧mà‧ro

AdjectiveEdit

amaro (feminine singular amara, masculine plural amari, feminine plural amare)

  1. bitter
    Antonym: dolce

NounEdit

amaro m (plural amari)

  1. bitter, bitterness
  2. any of several herbal liqueurs

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

amārō

  1. dative masculine singular of amārus
  2. dative neuter singular of amārus
  3. ablative masculine singular of amārus
  4. ablative neuter singular of amārus

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

amaro m (feminine singular amara, masculine plural amaros, feminine plural amaras, comparable)

  1. Alternative form of amargo

NounEdit

amaro m (plural amaros)

  1. amaro (an Italian herbal liqueur)

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

amaro

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of amarar.