andante

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian andante.

NounEdit

andante (plural andantes)

  1. (music) A tempo mark directing that a passage is to be played in a moderately slow tempo; faster than adagio but slower than moderato.
    • 2016, Ian McEwan, Nutshell, Vintage, page 198:
      The music’s marking is andante, a delicate footfall.
  2. (music) A passage having this mark.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

andante (not comparable)

  1. (music) Played at a moderately slow tempo.

AdjectiveEdit

andante (not comparable)

  1. (music) Describing a passage having this mark.

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian andante.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑndɑnt(ː)e/, [ˈɑndɑn̪t̪(ː)e̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑndɑnte
  • Syllabification: an‧dan‧te

NounEdit

andante

  1. (music) andante

DeclensionEdit

Rarely declined.

Inflection of andante (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative andante andantet
genitive andanten andantejen
partitive andantea andanteja
illative andanteen andanteihin
singular plural
nominative andante andantet
accusative nom. andante andantet
gen. andanten
genitive andanten andantejen
andanteinrare
partitive andantea andanteja
inessive andantessa andanteissa
elative andantesta andanteista
illative andanteen andanteihin
adessive andantella andanteilla
ablative andantelta andanteilta
allative andantelle andanteille
essive andantena andanteina
translative andanteksi andanteiksi
instructive andantein
abessive andantetta andanteitta
comitative andanteineen
Possessive forms of andante (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person andanteni andantemme
2nd person andantesi andantenne
3rd person andantensa

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

andante

  1. (music) andante

NounEdit

andante m (plural andantes)

  1. (music) andante

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From andare.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

andante (masculine and feminine plural andanti)

  1. going, walking
  2. current (month)
  3. continuous, unbroken
  4. ordinary, of little value
  5. agile

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

andante m (plural andanti)

  1. (music) andante

VerbEdit

andante

  1. present participle of andare

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • andante in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese andante, from andar (to walk) + -ante.

AdjectiveEdit

andante m or f (plural andantes, comparable)

  1. who roams, wanders
    Cavaleiro andante.Knight-errant.
    Synonyms: erradio, errante, itinerante, vagabundo, vagamundo, vagante
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

andante m, f (plural andantes)

  1. roamer (one who roams)
    Synonyms: itinerante, vagabundo

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian andante (going).

NounEdit

andante m (plural andantes)

  1. (music) andante (passage to be played in a moderately slow tempo)

AdjectiveEdit

andante m or f (plural andantes, comparable)

  1. (music) andante (played in a moderately slow tempo)
    Coordinate terms: adágio, alegro
Related termsEdit

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /anˈdante/, [ãn̪ˈd̪ãn̪.t̪e]

Etymology 1Edit

From andar (to walk) +‎ -ante.

AdjectiveEdit

andante (plural andantes)

  1. walking, who roams, who wanders, errant
    Caballero andante.Knight-errant.

NounEdit

andante m or f (plural andantes)

  1. roamer (one who roams)
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian andante (going).

NounEdit

andante m (plural andantes)

  1. (music) a tempo mark directing that a passage is to be played in a moderately slow tempo; faster than adagio but slower than allegretto
  2. (music) a passage having this mark

AdjectiveEdit

andante (plural andantes)

  1. (music) played in a moderately slow tempo

AdverbEdit

andante

  1. (music) with a moderately slow tempo

Further readingEdit