EnglishEdit

 
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An arcade covering a sidewalk (sense 1).
 
An arcade game (sense 3).

EtymologyEdit

French arcade, from Italian arcata (arch of a bridge), from Latin arcus (arc).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arcade (plural arcades)

  1. (architecture) A row of arches.
  2. (architecture) A covered passage, usually with shops on both sides.
  3. (video games) An establishment that runs coin-operated games.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: アーケード
  • Afrikaans: arcade
  • Czech: arkádové

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

arcade (third-person singular simple present arcades, present participle arcading, simple past and past participle arcaded)

  1. (transitive) To cover (something) as with a series of arches.
    • 1873, Thomas Mayne Reid, The Death Shot, London: Chapman and Hall, Volume 1, Chapter 25, p. 224,[1]
      its trottoirs brick-paved, and shaded by trees of almost tropical foliage— conspicuous among them the odoriferous magnolia, and the melia azedarach, or “Pride of China,”—these in places completely arcading the street—

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French arcade.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑrˈkaː.də/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ar‧ca‧de
  • Rhymes: -aːdə

NounEdit

arcade f (plural arcaden or arcades, diminutive arcadetje n)

  1. (architecture) arcade (array of arches)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Italian arcata, equivalent to arc +‎ -ade

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arcade f (plural arcades)

  1. (architecture) arcade
  2. (anatomy) arch, ridge
  3. (gaming) arcade

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit