See also: arc- and ARC

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English [Term?], borrowed from Old French arc, from Latin arcus (a bow, arc, arch). Doublet of arch and arco.

PronunciationEdit

 
A geometric arc, upper right.
 
An electric arc between two nails.

NounEdit

arc (plural arcs)

  1. (astronomy) That part of a circle which a heavenly body appears to pass through as it moves above and below the horizon. [from 14th c.]
  2. (geometry) A continuous part of the circumference of a circle (circular arc) or of another curve. [from 16th c.]
  3. A curve, in general. [from 17th c.]
  4. A band contained within parallel curves, or something of that shape. [from 17th c.]
  5. (electrics) A flow of current across an insulating medium; especially a hot, luminous discharge between either two electrodes or as lightning. [from 19th c.]
  6. A story arc. [from 20th c.]
  7. (mathematics) A continuous mapping from a real interval (typically [0, 1]) into a space.
  8. (graph theory) A directed edge.
  9. (basketball, slang) The three-point line.
  10. (film) An arclight.
    • 2012, Kris Malkiewicz, Film Lighting:
      For all practical purposes the old carbon arcs, which were the backbone of film lighting, are no longer used.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

arc (third-person singular simple present arcs, present participle arcing or arcking, simple past and past participle arced or arcked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To move following a curved path.
    • 2008, T. R. Elmore, Blood Ties Series, Volume 1, Tainted, Book 1 (page 106)
      A warring bloodhunter detected it and skillfully arced his sword through its spinal column before it could return to follow through with its attack.
    • 2011 February 4, Gareth Roberts, “Wales 19-26 England”, in BBC[1]:
      Gatland's side got back to within striking distance when fly-half Jones's clever pass sent centre Jonathan Davies arcing round Shontayne Hape.
  2. (transitive) To shape into an arc; to hold in the form of an arc.
    • 1953, James Baldwin, Go Tell It on the Mountain, New York: Knopf, Part One,
      His mother, her eyes raised to heaven, hands arked before her, moving, made real for John that patience, that endurance, that long suffering, which he had read in the Bible and found so hard to image.
  3. (intransitive) To form an electrical arc.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan arc, from Latin arcus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erkʷo-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow (weapon)
  2. (music) bow (used to play string instruments)
  3. (geometry) arc
  4. (architecture) arch

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French arc, from Latin arcus (bow, arch), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erkʷo-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow (weapon)
  2. arc (curve)
  3. (geometry) arc, circular arc, circle segment
  4. (architecture) arch

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin arcus.

NounEdit

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow (weapon)
  2. (architecture) arch

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

An archaic compound word of orr (nose) and száj (mouth), via Proto-Finno-Ugric elements. The original form of these two words was or and szá, the compound word orszá. Over time, the final vowel became short (orsza), the sz changed to c (orca), today a poetic or archaic version. The next change was the initial o to a (arca) which felt as a possessive form and later shortened to the current term.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arc (plural arcok)

  1. (anatomy) face

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative arc arcok
accusative arcot arcokat
dative arcnak arcoknak
instrumental arccal arcokkal
causal-final arcért arcokért
translative arccá arcokká
terminative arcig arcokig
essive-formal arcként arcokként
essive-modal arcul
inessive arcban arcokban
superessive arcon arcokon
adessive arcnál arcoknál
illative arcba arcokba
sublative arcra arcokra
allative archoz arcokhoz
elative arcból arcokból
delative arcról arcokról
ablative arctól arcoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
arcé arcoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
arcéi arcokéi
Possessive forms of arc
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. arcom arcaim
2nd person sing. arcod arcaid
3rd person sing. arca arcai
1st person plural arcunk arcaink
2nd person plural arcotok arcaitok
3rd person plural arcuk arcaik

Derived termsEdit

Compound words
Expressions

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN
  2. ^ arc in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • arc in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • arc in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress)

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish orc, arc (piglet).

NounEdit

arc m (genitive singular airc, nominative plural airc)

  1. piglet
  2. diminutive animal or person
Alternative formsEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman arc, from Latin arcus (a bow, arc, arch).

NounEdit

arc m (genitive singular airc, nominative plural airc)

  1. (mathematics, geometry) arc
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

arc m (genitive singular airc, nominative plural airc)

  1. Alternative form of earc (lizard; reptile)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arc n-arc harc not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin arcus.

NounEdit

arc m (oblique plural ars, nominative singular ars, nominative plural arc)

  1. bow (weapon made of a curved piece of wood or other flexible material whose ends are connected by a string)
  2. (architecture) arch

Coordinate termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: arc

Old High GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arc

  1. Alternative form of arg

ReferencesEdit

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin arcus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erkʷo-.

NounEdit

arc n (plural arcuri)

  1. bow (a weapon)
  2. (architecture) arch

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

arc n (plural arce)

  1. (geometry) arc

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

arc f

  1. Bee (apoidea).[1]
  2. Wasp (vespidae).[1]
  3. Impost, tax.[1]
  4. "Femen."(sic)[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 arc in “arc” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.; accessed on 7 May 2015.