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See also: Balsam

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English *balsam, balsme, from Old English balsam, balsamum (balsam, balm), from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (bálsamon, balsam), of Semitic origin (Hebrew בושם(spice, perfume)). Doublet of balm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

balsam (countable and uncountable, plural balsams)

  1. (chiefly Britain) A sweet-smelling oil or resin derived from various plants.
  2. (chiefly Britain) A plant or tree yielding such substance.
  3. (chiefly Britain) A soothing ointment.
  4. (chiefly Britain, figuratively) Something soothing.
    Classical music is a sweet balsam for our sorrows
  5. A flowering plant of the genus Impatiens.
  6. The balsam family of flowering plants (Balsaminaceae), which includes Impatiens and Hydrocera.
  7. A balsam fir Abies balsamea.
  8. Canada balsam, a turpentine obtained from the resin of balsam fir.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

balsam (third-person singular simple present balsams, present participle balsaming, simple past and past participle balsamed)

  1. (transitive) To treat or anoint with balsam.

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish balsam(m), balsaim(e), from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (bálsamon).

NounEdit

balsam m (genitive singular balsaim)

  1. (medicine) balsam, balm
  2. balsam (plant)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
balsam bhalsam mbalsam
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Old Polish balsam or balszam, from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (bálsamon, balsam).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbal.sam/
  • (file)

NounEdit

balsam m inan

  1. (technical) balsam (a sweet-smelling oil or resin derived from various plants)
  2. (cosmetics, medicine, pharmacology) lotion (a low-viscosity topical preparation intended for application to skin)
  3. (historical) a substance used in thanatopraxy (embalming of corpses), specifically any substance used for this practice in Ancient Egypt.
  4. (figuratively) balsam (something soothing)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • balsam in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin balsamum. Appears since 17th century. Probably entered Romanian through multiple routes, with the most common form from Italian balsamo, or through use in old medicinal practice. A now archaic variant form valsam derived from Greek βάλσαμο (válsamo). Cf. also German Balsam.[1]

NounEdit

balsam n (plural balsamuri)

  1. balsam (clarification of this definition is needed)
  2. unction, balm, salve, unguent

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit