See also: Bellow

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English belwen, from Old English bylgian, ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to sound, roar), whence also belg (leather bag), bellan (to roar), blāwan (to blow). Cognate with German bellen (to bark), Russian бле́ять (bléjatʹ, baa, bleat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bellow (plural bellows)

Examples
(file)
  1. The deep roar of a large animal, or any similar loud noise.
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      There was a tap at a door, a bull's bellow from within, and I was face to face with the Professor.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bellow (third-person singular simple present bellows, present participle bellowing, simple past and past participle bellowed)

  1. To make a loud, deep, hollow noise like the roar of an angry bull.
  2. To shout in a deep voice.
    • 2012 May 13, Alistair Magowan, “Sunderland 0-1 Man Utd”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Then, as the Sunderland fans' cheers bellowed around the stadium, United's title bid was over when it became apparent City had pinched a last-gasp winner to seal their first title in 44 years.

TranslationsEdit