EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bire, bier, byr, from Old English bȳre.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

byre (plural byres)

  1. (chiefly Britain) A barn, especially one used for keeping cattle in.
    • 1935, T.S. Eliot, Murder in the Cathedral, Part II:
      It was here in the kitchen, in the passage,
      In the mews in the harn in the byre in the market-place [...]
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 7, in 'The China Governess'[1]:
      ’Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. […]’
    • 1999, Neil Gaiman, Stardust, page 9 (2001 Perennial Edition):
      The visitors came up the narrow road through the forest from the south; they filled the spare-rooms, they bunked out in cow byres and barns.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *buriz (son).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

byre m (nominative plural byras or byre)

  1. child, son, descendant; young man, youth

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *buriz (hill, elevation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

byre m (nominative plural byras or byre)

  1. mound

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *buriz (favourable wind).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

byre m (nominative plural byras or byre)

  1. strong wind, storm
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: bir
    • English: birr

Etymology 4Edit

From Proto-Germanic *burjaz (opportunity), related to Old English byrian (to come up, occur).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

byre m (nominative plural byras or byre)

  1. time, opportunity; occurrence
Derived termsEdit
  • ambyre (favorable, fair)

Etymology 5Edit

Probably related to Old English būr. Perhaps identical to the word for a farm or dwelling in German -büren, Dutch -buren.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bȳre n (nominative plural bȳru)

  1. stall, shed, hut
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English bȳre, but possibly influenced in usage by Gaelic "bò" meaning a cow.

NounEdit

byre (plural byres)

  1. A cattle shed or outhouse
Derived termsEdit