storm

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English storm, from Old English storm ‎(a storm, tempest; a storm of arrows; disturbance, disquiet; uproar, tumult; rush, onrush, attack, violent attack), from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz ‎(storm), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around). Cognate with Scots storm ‎(storm), West Frisian stoarm ‎(storm), Dutch storm ‎(storm), Low German storm ‎(storm), German Sturm ‎(storm), Danish storm ‎(storm), Swedish storm ‎(storm), Icelandic stormur ‎(storm). Related to stir.

NounEdit

storm ‎(plural storms)

  1. Any disturbed state of the atmosphere, especially as affecting the earth's surface, and strongly implying destructive or unpleasant weather.
    • Shakespeare
      We hear this fearful tempest sing, / Yet seek no shelter to avoid the storm.
    • 2012 January 1, Donald Worster, “A Drier and Hotter Future”[1], American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 70:
      Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.
  2. A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; violent outbreak.
    The proposed reforms have led to a political storm.
    • Shakespeare
      Her sister / Began to scold and raise up such a storm.
  3. (meteorology) a wind scale for very strong wind, stronger than a gale, less than a hurricane (10 or higher on the Beaufort scale).
  4. (military) A violent assault on a stronghold or fortified position.
HyponymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English stormen, sturmen, from Old English styrman ‎(to storm, rage; make a great noise, cry aloud, shout), from Proto-Germanic *sturmijanan ‎(to storm). Cognate with Dutch stormen ‎(to storm; bluster), Low German stormen ‎(to storm), German stürmen ‎(to storm; rage; attack; assault), Swedish storma ‎(to storm; bluster), Icelandic storma ‎(to storm).

VerbEdit

storm ‎(third-person singular simple present storms, present participle storming, simple past and past participle stormed)

  1. (intransitive, with adverbial of direction) To move quickly and noisily like a storm, usually in a state of uproar or anger.
    She stormed out of the room.
  2. (intransitive) To rage or fume; to be in a violent temper.
    • Jonathan Swift
      The master storms, the lady scolds.
  3. (transitive) To assault (a stronghold or fortification) with military forces.
    Troops stormed the complex.
  4. (impersonal) To have the weather be violent, with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow.
    It stormed throughout the night.
TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse stormr ‎(storm), from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around).

NounEdit

storm c (singular definite stormen, plural indefinite storme)

  1. storm

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

storm

  1. imperative of storme

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch storm, from Old Dutch *storm, from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz.

Cognate with Low German Storm, German Sturm, West Frisian stoarm, English storm, Danish storm, Icelandic stormur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

storm m ‎(plural stormen, diminutive stormpje n)

  1. storm; a wind scale for very strong wind, stronger than a gale, less than a hurricane.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

VerbEdit

storm

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stormen
  2. imperative of stormen

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

storm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of stormur

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse stormr, from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around).

NounEdit

storm m ‎(definite singular stormen, indefinite plural stormer, definite plural stormene)

  1. a storm
    En kraftig storm er venta seinere i dag.
    A strong storm is expected to hit later today.
    en storm i et vannglass - a storm in a teacup (British)
Related termsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

storm

  1. imperative of storme

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse stormr, from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around).

NounEdit

storm m ‎(definite singular stormen, indefinite plural stormar, definite plural stormane)

  1. storm
    Ein kraftig storm er venta seinare i dag.
    A strong storm is expected to hit later today.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *sturmaz, whence also Old Saxon storm, Old High German sturm, Old Norse stormr. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around).

NounEdit

storm m

  1. storm

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse stormr, from Proto-Germanic *sturmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)twer-, *(s)tur- ‎(to rotate, swirl, twirl, move around).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /stɔrm/
  • (file)

NounEdit

storm c

  1. storm; heavy winds or weather associated with storm winds.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of storm
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative storm stormen stormar stormarna
Genitive storms stormens stormars stormarnas

See alsoEdit

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