English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English dessendaunte, borrowed from Middle French, from Latin dēscendēns, present participle of descendere, from + scandere (to climb, ascend).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈsɛndənt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: des‧cen‧dant

Adjective edit

descendant (not comparable)

  1. Descending; going down.
    The elevator resumed its descendant trajectory.
    • 1830, Thomas Robson (engraver.), The British herald, or Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, page 14:
      Eagle descendant, or descending. See DESCENDANT, and Pl. 22, fig. 6. Eagle descendant, displayed. See Pl. 22, fig. 7. Eagle displayed, recursant. See DISPLAYED RECURSANT, and Pl. 22, []
    • 1984, Charles A. Ravenstein, Air Force combat wings: lineage and honors histories 1947-1977, DIANE Publishing, →ISBN, page 259:
      Azure, surmounting a cloud argent, an American eagle descendant, wings endorsed proper, between his beak four lightning streaks, []
  2. Descending from a biological ancestor.
    Power in the kingdom is transferred in a descendant manner.
  3. Proceeding from a figurative ancestor or source.

Usage notes edit

The adjective may be spelled either with ant or ent as the final syllable (see descendent). The noun may be spelled only with ant.

Alternative forms edit

Antonyms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

descendant (plural descendants)

  1. One of the progeny of a specified person, at any distance of time or through any number of generations.
    The patriarch survived many descendants: five children, a dozen grandchildren, even a great grandchild.
  2. (figuratively) A thing that derives directly from a given precursor or source.
    This famous medieval manuscript has many descendants.
  3. (biology) A later evolutionary type.
    Dogs evolved as descendants of early wolves.
  4. (linguistics) A language that is descended from another.
    English and Scots are the descendants of Old English.
  5. (linguistics) A word or form in one language that is descended from a counterpart in an ancestor language.
    Synonyms: reflex, derivative
    Antonym: etymon
    Coordinate term: cognate
    • 1993, Jens Elmegård Rasmussen, “The Slavic i-verbs with an excursus on the Indo-European ē-verbs”, in Bela Brogyanyi, Reiner Lipp, editors, Comparative-Historical Linguistics, John Benjamins Publishing, →ISBN, page 479:
      The direct descendant of this form is the Slavic aorist: Sb.-Cr. nȍsī, dȍnosī.

Usage notes edit

The adjective may be spelled either with ant or ent as the final syllable (see descendent). The noun may be spelled only with ant.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin dēscendentem, the present participle of dēscendere, itself from + scandere (climb, ascend).

Pronunciation edit

Participle edit

descendant

  1. present participle of descendre
  2. (preceded by en) gerund of descendre

Noun edit

descendant m (plural descendants, feminine descendante)

  1. a descendant; one who is the progeny of someone at any distance of time; e.g. a child; a grandchild, etc.

Antonyms edit

Adjective edit

descendant (feminine descendante, masculine plural descendants, feminine plural descendantes)

  1. (which is) descending
    Antonyms: ascendant, montant

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Verb edit

dēscendant

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of dēscendō