cite

See also: cité

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French citer, from Latin citare ‎(to cause to move, excite, summon), frequentive of ciēre ‎(to rouse, excite, call).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cite ‎(third-person singular simple present cites, present participle citing, simple past and past participle cited)

  1. To quote; to repeat, as a passage from a book, or the words of another.
  2. To list the source(s) from which one took information, words or literary or verbal context.
  3. To summon officially or authoritatively to appear in court.
Usage notesEdit

Loosely, or for brevity in journalism, the word is used to mean no more than "mention". [an extension of sense 1]

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the first syllable of citation. Analogous to quote, from quotation.

NounEdit

cite ‎(plural cites)

  1. (informal) a citation
    We used the number of cites as a rough measure of the significance of each published paper.
TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

cite

  1. vocative masculine singular of citus

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French cité, from Latin civitas

NounEdit

cite (plural cites)

  1. city

Coordinate termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

cite

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of citar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of citar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of citar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of citar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

cite

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of citar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of citar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of citar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of citar.
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