English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Shortening

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cit (plural cits)

  1. (derogatory, now rare) Clipping of citizen: a citizen; a city dweller, a townsman.
    • 1714, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees:
      [] the women of quality are frightened to see merchants wives and daughters dressed like themselves: this impudence of the city, they cry, is intolerable; mantua-makers are sent for, and the contrivance of fashions becomes all their study, that they may have always new modes ready to take up, as soon as those saucy cits shall begin to imitate those in being.
    • 1760 January 28 (first performance), [Samuel] Foote, The Minor, a Comedy. [], London: [] J. Coote, []; G[eorge] Kearsly, []; T[homas] Davies, [], published 1760, →OCLC, Act II, page 56:
      Here comes the muſty trader, running over vvith remonſtrances. I muſt banter the cit.
    • 1856, Herman Melville, The Piazza:
      Not forgotten are the blue noses of the carpenters, and how they scouted at the greenness of the cit, who would build his sole piazza to the north.
    • 1911 October 26, Max Beerbohm, Zuleika Dobson, or, An Oxford Love Story, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: John Lane Company, published 1912, →OCLC:
      If, when that war was declared, every one had been sure that not only should we fail to conquer the Transvaal, but that IT would conquer US [] how would the cits have felt then?
    • 1930, Norman Lindsay, Redheap, Sydney, N.S.W.: Ure Smith, published 1965, →OCLC, page 154:
      As a new-comer in the township, as a cit, and a devotee to beer, Cummings was an excuse to keep an eye on Millie[.]
  2. Clipping of citation.

Derived terms

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References

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  • Oxford English Dictionary

Anagrams

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Czech

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Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology

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Deverbal from cítit.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cit m inan (related adjective citový)

  1. feeling
    získat cit proto get a feel for
    chovat citto have affection
  2. emotion
    Synonym: emoce

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • cit in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • cit in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • cit in Internetová jazyková příručka

Esperanto

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Gallo

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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cit m (plural cits)

  1. cider

Lashi

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /t͡ʃit/, /t͡ɕit/

Adjective

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cit

  1. little, small

References

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  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[1], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Latin

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Verb

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cit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of ciō

Old French

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Etymology

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From Latin cīvitās via the nominative singular. Compare citet, from the Latin accusative cīvitātem.

Noun

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cit

  1. Synonym of citet

References

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Van Emdem, Wolfgang G. 2000. Medieval French representations of city and other walls. In Tracy, James (ed.), City walls: The urban enceinte in global perspective, 540. Cambridge University Press.

Old Irish

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Etymology

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Univerbation of cía (though) +‎ bat (be, 3rd person plural present subjunctive)

Pronunciation

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Verb

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cit

  1. though… (they) are (subjunctive)
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 207b11
      Cit comṡuidigthi la Grécu ní écen dúnni beta comṡuidigthi linn.
      Although they are compounds in Greek (lit. with the Greeks), it is not necessary for us that they be compounds in our language (lit. with us).

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cit chit cit
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Pali

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Alternative forms

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Verb

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cit

  1. root of cintayati

Zhuang

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Tai *cɯːtᴰ (insipid). Cognate with Thai จืด (jʉ̀ʉt), Lao ຈືດ (chư̄t), Shan ၸိုတ်ႇ (tsùet).

Adjective

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cit (Sawndip forms 𰝘 or 𭶈 or or or or 𠮟 or ⿰米直 or ⿰淡出, 1957–1982 spelling cit)

  1. bland; insipid
    Synonyms: (dialectal) cwt, (dialectal) cuet, (dialectal) ciu
  2. having poor appetite
  3. cold; emotionally distant
    Synonyms: (dialectal) cwt, (dialectal) cuet

Etymology 2

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Cognate with Thai จุด?”)

Verb

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cit (Sawndip forms or 𤊧 or or 𰞩 or 𭵎 or ⿺燒出, 1957–1982 spelling cit)

  1. to ignite; to light; to start (a fire)
    Synonyms: diemj, (dialectal) gyot, (dialectal) lej
  2. to smoke (a cigarette)
    Synonyms: (dialectal) gwn, (dialectal) cup, (dialectal) ndoet, (dialectal) cwt, (dialectal) boep, (dialectal) coemh
    cit ien
    to smoke cigarettes
  3. to treat with moxibustion
    Synonyms: (dialectal) huj, (dialectal) ndut, (dialectal) ndat, (dialectal) gyot, (dialectal) nat

Etymology 3

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From Chinese .

Classifier

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cit (1957–1982 spelling cit)

  1. Used for performances, e.g., plays, operas, storytellings.