See also: cit., ciť, and č̓it

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened from citizen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cit (plural cits)

  1. (derogatory, now rare) A citizen; a townsman, city dweller.
    • 1714, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees
      [] the women of quality are frightened to see merchants wives and daughters dressed like themselves: this impudence of the city, they cry, is intolerable; mantua-makers are sent for, and the contrivance of fashions becomes all their study, that they may have always new modes ready to take up, as soon as those saucy cits shall begin to imitate those in being.
    • 1856, Herman Melville, The Piazza
      Not forgotten are the blue noses of the carpenters, and how they scouted at the greenness of the cit, who would build his sole piazza to the north.
    • 1911, Max Beerbohm, Zuleika Dobson:
      “If, when that war was declared, every one had been sure that not only should we fail to conquer the Transvaal, but that IT would conquer US [] how would the cits have felt then?”
    • 1930, Norman Lindsay, Redheap, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1965, page 154:
      As a new-comer in the township, as a cit, and a devotee to beer, Cummings was an excuse to keep an eye on Millie[.]

ReferencesEdit

  • Oxford English Dictionary

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cit m

  1. feeling
  2. emotion

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


EsperantoEdit


GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

cit m (plural cits)

  1. cider

LashiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /t͡ʃit/, /t͡ɕit/

AdjectiveEdit

cit

  1. little, small

ReferencesEdit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[1], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis).

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

cit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of ciō

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Univerbation of cía (though) +‎ bat (be, 3rd person plural present subjunctive)

VerbEdit

cit

  1. though… (they) are (subjunctive)
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 207b11
      Cit comṡuidigthi la Grécu ní écen dúnni beta comṡuidigthi linn.
      Although they are compounds in Greek (lit. with the Greeks), it is not necessary for us that they be compounds in our language (lit. with us).

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cit chit cit
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

cit

  1. root of cintayati