English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin dominus (lord, head of household), akin to Italian don, Sicilian don, Spanish don; from domus (house). Doublet of dom, domine, dominie, and dominus.

Noun edit

don (plural dons)

  1. A university professor, particularly one at Oxford or Cambridge.
    • 1859–1861, [Thomas Hughes], chapter I, in Tom Brown at Oxford: [], part 1st, Boston, Mass.: Ticknor and Fields, published 1861, →OCLC, page 12:
      No one feeds at the high table except the dons and the gentlemen-commoners, who are undergraduates in velvet caps and silk gowns[.]
    • 1876, George Eliot [pseudonym; Mary Ann Evans], chapter XVI, in Daniel Deronda, volume I, Edinburgh, London: William Blackwood and Sons, →OCLC, book II (Meeting Streams), page 321:
      The truth is, unless a man can get the prestige and income of a Don and write donnish books, it’s hardly worth while for him to make a Greek and Latin machine of himself and be able to spin you out pages of the Greek dramatists at any verse you’ll give him as a cue.
  2. An employee of a university residence who lives among the student residents.
  3. A mafia boss.
  4. (MLE) Any man, bloke, dude.
    • 2017 October 31, Loski (lyrics and music), “Olympic Chinging”‎[1], from 1:55:
      I’m confused like who’s this don
      .22 bells and that who’s on
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English don (to put on), from Old English dōn on. Compare also doff, dup, dout.

Verb edit

don (third-person singular simple present dons, present participle donning, simple past and past participle donned)

  1. (transitive) To put on clothing; to dress (oneself) in an article of personal attire.
    Synonyms: put on, clothe, dight, enrobe; see also Thesaurus:clothe
    Antonym: doff
    To don one's clothes.
    • 1886-88, Richard Francis Burton, The Supplemental Nights to the Thousand Nights and a Night:
      Now when he had reached the King's capital wherein was Alaeddin, he alighted at one of the Kháns; and, when he had rested from the weariness of wayfare, he donned his dress and went down to wander about the streets, where he never passed a group without hearing them prate about the pavilion and its grandeur and vaunt the beauty of Alaeddin and his lovesomeness, his liberality and generosity, his fine manners and his good morals.
    • 2022 March 23, Paul Bigland, “HS2 is just 'passing through'”, in RAIL, number 953, page 41:
      Having donned our PPE, we walk through the site to the prefab that controls access to the tunnel.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • do (Standard Albanian)

Etymology edit

Gheg variant of Standard Albanian do ((it) wants, needs, loves, likes) and do (you want, need, love, like).

Verb edit

don (aorist dashta, participle dashtë) (Gheg forms)

  1. you want, need
    A don me shkue? (Gheg)Do you want to go?
  2. you like
    Rita e don Gjergjin. (Gheg)Rita likes/wants George.
  3. you love
  4. it wants, needs
  5. it likes
  6. it loves

Conjugation edit

  • Standard Albanian conjugation:

Related terms edit

Azerbaijani edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Turkic *tōn. Cognate with Chuvash тум (tum).

Noun edit

don (definite accusative donu, plural donlar)

  1. dress (worn by women)
    Synonym: paltar
  2. gown (loose, flowing upper garment)
  3. (figurative) raiment, attire, garb, habiliments
  4. appearance, look (of a person)
Declension edit
    Declension of don
singular plural
nominative don
donlar
definite accusative donu
donları
dative dona
donlara
locative donda
donlarda
ablative dondan
donlardan
definite genitive donun
donların
    Possessive forms of don
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) donum donlarım
sənin (your) donun donların
onun (his/her/its) donu donları
bizim (our) donumuz donlarımız
sizin (your) donunuz donlarınız
onların (their) donu or donları donları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) donumu donlarımı
sənin (your) donunu donlarını
onun (his/her/its) donunu donlarını
bizim (our) donumuzu donlarımızı
sizin (your) donunuzu donlarınızı
onların (their) donunu or donlarını donlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) donuma donlarıma
sənin (your) donuna donlarına
onun (his/her/its) donuna donlarına
bizim (our) donumuza donlarımıza
sizin (your) donunuza donlarınıza
onların (their) donuna or donlarına donlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) donumda donlarımda
sənin (your) donunda donlarında
onun (his/her/its) donunda donlarında
bizim (our) donumuzda donlarımızda
sizin (your) donunuzda donlarınızda
onların (their) donunda or donlarında donlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) donumdan donlarımdan
sənin (your) donundan donlarından
onun (his/her/its) donundan donlarından
bizim (our) donumuzdan donlarımızdan
sizin (your) donunuzdan donlarınızdan
onların (their) donundan or donlarından donlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) donumun donlarımın
sənin (your) donunun donlarının
onun (his/her/its) donunun donlarının
bizim (our) donumuzun donlarımızın
sizin (your) donunuzun donlarınızın
onların (their) donunun or donlarının donlarının
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Turkic *doŋ (frozen; frost). See Bashkir туң (tuñ) for more cognates.

Adjective edit

don (comparative daha don, superlative ən don)

  1. frozen, congealed

Noun edit

don (definite accusative donu, plural donlar)

  1. frost
  2. ice-covered ground, black ice
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • don” in Obastan.com.

Bambara edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don

  1. day

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

don (tone dòn)

  1. (intransitive) to enter
  2. (transitive) to put (something into something)
  3. to put on, wear (of clothing)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Predicative edit

don (tone dòn)

  1. marks the predicate

References edit

Breton edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Brythonic *duβn, from Proto-Celtic *dubnos, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰubʰnós.

Adjective edit

don

  1. deep

Casiguran Dumagat Agta edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Philippine *dahun, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *dahun.

Noun edit

dön

  1. leaf (of a plant)

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish don, which is from Latin dominus (lord).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don m anim

  1. (in Italian environment) (Originally a title of honour of the Pope, later used for all priests and later for aristocrats)
    don Giovanni(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. (Spanish noble title) [19th c.]
  3. (title of respect in front of Spanish given names)
    don José(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  4. don (maffia boss)
    • 2003, Miroslav Nožina, Mezinárodní organizovaný zločin v České republice, Themis, →ISBN, page 156:
      Roku 1876 mafiánský don Raffaele Palizollo reformoval dosavadní strategii nevměšování se mafie do veřejného života.
      In 1876 mafia don Raffaele Palizollo reformed the previous strategy of mafia not interfering into public affairs.
    • 2012, Hana Pernicová, transl., Kolumbova záhada[2], Ostrava: Domino, translation of original by Steve Berry, →ISBN, page 412:
      Simon se zatvářil stejně jako drogový don před čtyřmi dny.
      Simon had the same expression as the drug mafia don four days ago.

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Rejzek, Jiří (2015), “don”, in Český etymologický slovník [Czech Etymological Dictionary] (in Czech), 3rd (revised and expanded) edition, Praha: LEDA, →ISBN, page 153
  • "don" in Věra Petráčková, Jiří Kraus et al. Akademický slovník cizích slov. Academia, 1995, ISBN 80-200-0497-1, page 175.
  • don in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • don in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Anagrams edit

Dupaningan Agta edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Philippine *dahun, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *dahun.

Noun edit

don

  1. leaf (of a plant)

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French don, from Latin dōnum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don m (plural dons)

  1. gift, talent, knack
  2. gift (present)
  3. donation

Derived terms edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Late Latin domnus, from Latin dominus (lord). Cognates include Spanish don.

Noun edit

don m (plural dons, feminine dona, feminine plural donas)

  1. sir, mister

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

don

  1. Contraction of do an.
    Thug mé don bhuachaill é.I gave it to the boy.
    Tá mé ag dul don Spáinn.I'm going to Spain.
Usage notes edit

This contraction is obligatory, i.e. *do an never appears uncontracted. It triggers lenition of a following consonant other than d, s, or t.

Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish don (misfortune, evil).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don

  1. misfortune
Usage notes edit

Used only in a few stock maledictions such as Do dhon is do dhuais ort!, Don is duais ort!, Mo dhon is mo dhograinn ort! (all basically "bad luck to you!") and Don d’fhiafraí ort! (Don’t be so inquisitive!).

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
don dhon ndon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From a shortening of an earlier donno, from dom'no (used by Dante), from Latin domnus < dominus. Compare Sicilian don.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don m (invariable)

  1. Father (a title given to priests)
  2. a title of respect to a man

Descendants edit

  • French: dom

Jamaican Creole edit

Etymology edit

From English don, particularly in the sense of a crime boss.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdan/
  • Hyphenation: don

Noun edit

don (plural don dem or dons dem, quantified don)

  1. don, leader, community leader, crime boss, head of a garrison (leader)
    Dem figet seh mi a di one don?
    Have they forgotten that I'm the one true leader?
    From di word start go roun' seh him want turn di don, a whole heap a man start pree him and warn him fi be careful.
    As soon as word got around that he wanted to become the community leader, a lot of people took notice of him and warned him to be careful.

Derived terms edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

don

  1. Rōmaji transcription of どん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ドン

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English dōn, from Proto-West Germanic *dōn, from Proto-Germanic *dōną.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

don

  1. To do, perform (an activity)
  2. To complete, finish
  3. To make, create
  4. To put, place, position, raise
  5. To remove, take away
  6. To go or move (in a specified direction)
  7. To behave (in a specified manner
  8. (auxiliary) To cause (an action or state)
  9. (auxiliary) Emphasises the verb that follows it
  10. (auxiliary) Stands in for a verb in a dependent clause
Usage notes edit

As in modern English, several uses of this verb are highly idiomatic.

Conjugation edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English dōn on.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

don

  1. (Late Middle English) to put on
Conjugation edit
Descendants edit
References edit

Middle Low German edit

Etymology edit

From Old Saxon dōn.

Verb edit

dôn

  1. to do

Conjugation edit

Irregular: present 1sg , 2sg deist (dôst, dṏst), 3sg deit (dôt, dṏt), pl. dôn, dôt, dṏt, preterit 1sg dede, 2sg dêdest, 3sg dede, pl. dêden, past participle gedân, dân

Nigerian Pidgin edit

Etymology edit

From English done.

Verb edit

don

  1. have (perfect aspect auxiliary)
    Wi don chop.We have eaten.

Northern Kurdish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Arabicدُهْن(duhn). But compare Turkish donyağı, don yağı (tallow), which is said to be from the root of donmak (to freeze).

Noun edit

don m

  1. (melted) fat, grease
    Synonym: bez
    Bîne nanê genimî, duhn bide, bêxe leşê min, ezê sax bim.Bring wheat bread, spread it with fat, put it on my body and I shall be cured [i.e., come to life again].

References edit

  • Chyet, Michael L. (2020), “don”, in Ferhenga Birûskî: Kurmanji–English Dictionary (Language Series; 1), volume I, London: Transnational Press, page 201b
  • Gülensoy, Tuncer (1994), “don”, in Kürtçenin Etimolojik Sözlüğü [Etymological Dictionary of Kurdish] (in Turkish), Ankara: Türk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, page 65

Northern Sami edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Samic *tonë.

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈton/

Pronoun edit

don

  1. you (singular)
Inflection edit
Inflection of don (irregular)
Nominative don
Genitive
Nominative don
Genitive
Accusative
Illative dutnje
Locative dūs
Comitative duinna
Essive dūnin
See also edit
Personal pronouns
singular dual plural
1st person mun moai mii
2nd person don doai dii
3rd person son soai sii
Further reading edit
  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[3], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈtoːn/

Determiner edit

dōn

  1. accusative/genitive singular of dōt

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin dōnum.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

don m (plural dons)

  1. gift (something given to another voluntarily)
  2. gift (a talent or natural ability)
  3. donation (a voluntary gift or contribution for a specific cause)

Related terms edit

Old English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *dōn (to do). The exact development of past tense forms dyde, dydest, and dydon are unexplained, for such forms have -y- instead of expected *-e- (*dede, *dedest, *dedon) from Proto-Germanic past stem *ded-/*dēd-.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

dōn

  1. to do
    Hwæt dēst þū?
    What are you doing?
  2. to make, cause
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "The Passion of St. Bartholomew the Apostle"
      Þū dydest mīnne brōðor his god forlǣtan.
      You made my brother renounce his god.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Matthew 3:3
      Ġeġearwiaþ Dryhtnes weġ, dōþ his sīðas rihte.
      Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Matthew 4:19
      Folgiaþ mē, and iċ þæt ġit bēoþ manna fisċeras.
      Follow me, and I'll make you fishers of people.
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, the Old English Hexateuch, Genesis 42:36
      Þā cwæþ Iācōb heora fæder, "Bearnlēasne ġē habbaþ mē ġedōnne. Næbbe iċ Iōsēp and Simeon is on bendum; nū ġē nimaþ Beniamin æt mē."
      Then Jacob, their father, said, "You have made me childless. I don't have Joseph and Simeon is in chains; now you're taking Benjamin from me."
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "The Nativity of St. Andrew the Apostle"
      Swā swā hī ǣr mid nette fixodon on sǣlicum yðum, swa dyde Crist þæt hī siððan mid his heofonlican lāre manna sawla gefixodon; forðan ðe hī ætbrudon folces menn fram flæsclicum lustum, and fram woruldlicum gedwyldum to staðolfæstnysse lybbendra eorðan, þæt is to ðam ecan eðle, be ðam cwæð se witega þurh Godes Gast, "Ic asende mine fisceras, and hī gefixiað hī; mine huntan, and hī huntiað hī of ælcere dune and of ælcere hylle."
      As they before with a net had fished on the sea waves, so Christ caused them afterwards by his heavenly lore to fish for the souls of men; for they withdrew the people from fleshly lusts, and from worldly errors to the stability of the earth of the living, that is, to the eternal country, of which the prophet, through God's Spirit, said, "I will send my fishers, and they shall fish for them; my hunters, and they shall hunt them from every down and from every hill."
  3. to put
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Mark 7:33
      dyde his fingras on his ēaran.
      He put his fingers in his ears.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Matthew 26:52
      Þā cwæþ sē Hǣlend tō him, " þīn sweord eft on his sċēaðe."
      Then Jesus said to him, "Put your sword back in its sheath."
  4. to add
    • c. 1011, Byrhtferth, Manual[4]:
      Blōtmōnaþ hæfþ seofon rēgulārēs. þrītiġ þǣr tō, þonne bēoþ þæt seofon and þrītiġ.
      November has seven regulares. Add thirty to that, and it is thirty-seven.
  5. to treat someone (+ dative) a certain way
    • c. 973, Æthelwold, translation of the Rule of Saint Benedict
      XXXV. Be þām þæt man eallum munucum ġelīċe dōn sċyle.
      35. On how all monks should be treated equally.
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of Boethius' The Consolation of Philosophy
      Ēalā hū yfele mē dōþ maniġe weoroldmenn mid þām þæt iċ ne mōt wealdan mīnra āgenra þēawa.
      Many worldly people treat me so badly, I'm not allowed to use my own strengths.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Luke 16:19
      Nū iċ neom wierðe þæt iċ bēo þīn sunu nemned. mē swā ānne of þīnum ierðlingum.
      I don't deserve to be called your son anymore. Treat me as one of your fieldworkers.

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin donum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don oblique singularm (oblique plural dons, nominative singular dons, nominative plural don)

  1. gift

Descendants edit

  • French: don
  • Middle English: done

Old Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Univerbation of di (of/from) +‎ in (the sg)

Article edit

don

  1. of/from the sg
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Univerbation of do (to/for) +‎ in (the sg)

Article edit

don

  1. to/for the sg
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

don (gender unknown)

  1. misfortune, evil
Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
don don
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Saxon edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *dōn.

Verb edit

dōn

  1. to do

Conjugation edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle Low German: dôn
    • Low German: deoen (Paderbornisch), dohn (Münsterländisch); doon

Old Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Late Latin dom, from domnus (master, sir), from Latin dominus, from domus (a house).

Noun edit

don m (plural dones)

  1. (honorific) sir, master; a title prefixed to male given names
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 1r:
      [R]emont por la gracia de dios. arçobispo de Toledo. a don almeric. arçidiano de antiochia con grant amor ſalut ⁊ amidtad.
      Remont, by the Grace of God archbishop of Toledo, to master Almerich, archdeacon of Antioch, with great love, haleness and goodwill.
Descendants edit
  • Spanish: don (see there for further descendants)

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin dōnum (a gift), from (I give).

Noun edit

don m (plural dones)

  1. gift, talent
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 65r:
      eſtonces el rey dio grandes dones adaniel e diol ſennoria ſobre ſos ſabios e la cibdat de babilonia []
      Then the king gave Daniel great gifts and gave him rulership over his wise men and the city of Babylon []
Descendants edit

Etymology 3 edit

Shortening of dont.

Adverb edit

don

  1. Apocopic form of dont; where
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 56r:
      Euino el ppħa iſaẏas e dixo al reẏ ezechias uinieron eſtos barones. ⁊ q̃ te dixieron dixo el de tierra de luen uinieron de babilonia.
      And the prophet Isaiah came and said to king Hezekiah, “Where did these men come from, and what did they say to you?” He said, “From a distant land. They came from Babylon”.
Descendants edit
  • Spanish: do

Scottish Gaelic edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /t̪ɔn̪ˠ/
  • Hyphenation: don

Preposition edit

don (+ dative)

  1. (higher register) Contraction of do an.
    Chaidh i don bhùth.She went to the shop.

Usage notes edit

  • Like the bare article an, don triggers lenition if the following noun begins with f, c and g.
  • In the modern language this form is considered to be high register, with dhan being generally more common.

References edit

  • Colin Mark (2003), “do”, in The Gaelic-English dictionary, London: Routledge, →ISBN, page 235

Sicilian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From a shortening of an earlier donnu (master, sir), from Latin domnus < dominus, from domus (a house), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm (a house), from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /dɔn/ (Standard)
  • IPA(key): /ɾɔn/ (Rhotacized)
  • Rhymes: -on
  • Hyphenation: don

Noun edit

don m (inv)

  1. (obsolete) sir, master, lord
  2. (obsolete) social honorary title referred to men possessing patrimonial assets
  3. a title of respect to a man, especially older, prefixed to first names

Coordinate terms edit

Related terms edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdon/ [ˈd̪õn]
  • Rhymes: -on
  • Syllabification: don

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Late Latin dom (a courtesy title for monks and abbots), from domnus (master, sir), from Classical Latin dominus, from domus (a house), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm (a house), from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Noun edit

don m (plural dones, feminine doña, feminine plural doñas)

  1. (obsolete) sir, master, lord
  2. a title of respect to a man, prefixed to first names
    • 1844, José Zorrilla, Don Juan Tenorio[5], lines 57–58:
      [Y] dime: don Luis Mejías ¿ha venido hoy?
      [A]nd tell me: mister Luis Mejía, did he come today?
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Catalan: don
  • Czech: don
  • Tagalog: Don

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin dōnum (a gift) (whence English donation), from (to give), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give).

Noun edit

don m (plural dones)

  1. gift, present
  2. gift, talent, knack
    Cielos, tu tío realmente tiene un don para gastar todo su dinero en el casino, ¿no?
    Yikes, your uncle really has a knack for blowing all his money in the casino, doesn't he?
Usage notes edit
  • Like with the English word "knack", don can be used to describe a positive gift or talent, or a negative one like a bad habit or a neutral tendency to do something.
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Sranan Tongo edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch dom.

Adjective edit

don

  1. stupid

Noun edit

don

  1. stupidity
    Sranan odo: don no abi dresi.
    Surinamese proverb: there is no medicine for stupidity.

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Low German don ("doing," work, thing), from Low German don (do), which is cognate with English do, German tun.

Noun edit

don n

  1. a tool, an implement
    Synonym: (colloquial) doning

Declension edit

Declension of don 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative don donet don donen
Genitive dons donets dons donens

Derived terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Turkish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Ottoman Turkishطون(don), from Proto-Turkic *tōn.

Noun edit

don

  1. underpants
  2. jogging pants
  3. pants
  4. shorts

Etymology 2 edit

From Ottoman Turkishطوڭ(doñ), from Proto-Turkic *toŋ. Cognate with Chuvash тӑм (tăm), also related to Chinese (dòng).[1]

Noun edit

don

  1. frost

Verb edit

don

  1. second-person singular imperative of donmak

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ İnayet, A. (1998). Çincedeki Türkçe Kelimeler Üzerine . Türk Dünyası Dil ve Edebiyat Dergisi , (6) , . Retrieved from https://dergipark.org.tr/en/pub/tdded/issue/12716/154815

Uzbek edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Classical Persianدانه(dāna).

Noun edit

don

  1. grain

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

(classifier con) don

  1. Atherurus macrourus, Asiatic brush-tailed porcupine
    Synonym: đon

West Makian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

don

  1. a cape, headland

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[6], Pacific linguistics

Yogad edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Philippine *dahun, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *dahun.

Noun edit

don

  1. leaf (of a plant)

Yola edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English don, from Old English dōn on.

Verb edit

don

  1. To put on, as clothes, dress.

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 36

Zazaki edit

Noun edit

don

  1. kind of bread

Zou edit

Verb edit

don

  1. drink

References edit