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GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

þē

  1. Romanization of 𐌸𐌴

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English þe (the; he), a late variant of se.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

þe

  1. the
    • 1420, The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056, “Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone”, in Robert von Fleischhacker, editor, Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie."[1], London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of original by Lanfranc of Milan, published 1894, →ISBN, page 63:
      Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.
      Don't bring the two pieces of the bone that is broken or dislocated together until 8 days have passed if it's winter or 5 days if it's summer; otherwise it will make pus and be sicker from swelling. After the time has passed bring together the pieces or the dislocation according to the teaching that shall be said in the chapter entitled Algebra.
    • 1431, A rem' that William Baker, Pewtrer, & John Hetheman [made] the first day of May, þe ȝere of kynge herry þe vje, after þe conquest xe. — Henry Littlehales (editor), The Medieval Records of a London City Church, page 26.
DescendantsEdit
  • Scots: the
  • English: the

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English þē (you, thee), accusative and dative form of þū.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

þe (nominative þou)

  1. Second-person singular pronoun indicating a grammatical object: thee, you.
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

PronounEdit

þe

  1. Alternative form of þei

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old English þēon.

VerbEdit

þe

  1. Alternative form of theen

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *þa, from Proto-Indo-European *tó, *te-.

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

þe (indeclinable, relative)

  1. that, who, which
    Ne fyrhteð þa þe on synnum lyfiað.Do not fear those who live in sin. (Ælfwine's Prayerbook)

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *þiz.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

þē

  1. accusative/dative of þū: thee, you
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From earlier se, through influence of the þ- forms.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

þē m

  1. (demonstrative) the, he: late variant of se

DescendantsEdit