EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin collidere (to strike or clash together), from com- (together) + laedere (to strike, dash against, hurt); see lesion.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəˈlɑɪd/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

collide (third-person singular simple present collides, present participle colliding, simple past and past participle collided)

  1. (intransitive) To impact directly, especially if violent.
    When a body collides with another, then momentum is conserved.
    • (Can we date this quote by Tyndall and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Across this space the attraction urges them. They collide, they recoil, they oscillate.
    • (Can we date this quote by Carlyle and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      No longer rocking and swaying, but clashing and colliding.
    • 2012 June 2, Phil McNulty, “England 1-0 Belgium”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      And this friendly was not without its injury worries, with defender Gary Cahill substituted early on after a nasty, needless push by Dries Mertens that caused him to collide with goalkeeper Joe Hart, an incident that left the Chelsea defender requiring a precautionary X-ray at Wembley.
  2. (intransitive) To come into conflict, or be incompatible.
    China collided with the modern world.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

collide

  1. third-person singular present indicative of collidere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

collīde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of collīdō