commerce

See also: Commerce and commercé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French commerce, from Latin commercium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

commerce (countable and uncountable, plural commerces)

  1. (business) The exchange or buying and selling of commodities; especially the exchange of merchandise, on a large scale, between different places or communities; extended trade or traffic.
  2. Social intercourse; the dealings of one person or class in society with another; familiarity.
    • 1911, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “Bunyan, John”, in 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica:
      Fifteen years of thought, observation, and commerce with the world had made him [Bunyan] wiser.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      Suppose we held our converse not in words, but in music; those who have a bad ear would find themselves cut off from all near commerce, and no better than foreigners in this big world.
  3. (obsolete) Sexual intercourse.
    • 1648, Walter Montagu Miscellanea Spiritualia, or Devout Essaies
      these perillous commerces of our love
  4. An 18th-century French card game in which the cards are subject to exchange, barter, or trade.[1]

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

commerce (third-person singular simple present commerces, present participle commercing, simple past and past participle commerced)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To carry on trade; to traffic.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To hold conversation; to communicate.
    • 1842, Alfred Tennyson, “Walking to the Mail”, in Poems. [], volume II, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 1008064829, page 48:
      No, sir, he, / Vex'd with a morbid devil in his blood / That veil'd the world with jaundice, hid his face / From all men, and commercing with himself, / He lost the sense that handles daily life— []
    • 1844, John Wilson, Essay on the Genius, and Character of Burns:
      Musicians [] taught the people in angelic harmonies to commerce with heaven.

Further readingEdit

  1. ^ a. 1769, Edmond Hoyle, Hoyle's Games

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French commerce, borrowed from Latin commercium (commerce, trade), from com- (together) + merx (good, wares, merchandise); see merchant, mercenary.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.mɛʁs/
  • (file)

NounEdit

commerce m (plural commerces)

  1. commerce, trade
  2. store, shop, trader

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Louisiana Creole FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French commerce (commerce).

NounEdit

commerce

  1. business, commerce

ReferencesEdit

  • Alcée Fortier, Louisiana Folktales