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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English concubine (first attested 1250–1300), from Anglo-Norman concubine, from Latin concubīna, equivalent to concub- (variant stem of concumbō (to lie together)) + feminine suffix -īna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

concubine (plural concubines)

  1. A sexual partner, especially a woman, to whom one is not or cannot be married.
  2. A woman who lives with a man, but who is not a wife.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part III, Act III, sc. 2:
      And that is more than I will yield unto:
      I know I am too mean to be your queen,
      And yet too good to be your concubine.
  3. (chiefly historical) A slave-girl or woman, kept for instance in a harem, who is held for sexual service.
    • 1611, King James Version, Judges 20:4–6:
      And the Levite, the husband of the woman that was slain, answered and said, I came into Gibeah that belongeth to Benjamin, I and my concubine, to lodge. And the men of Gibeah rose against me, and beset the house round about upon me by night, and thought to have slain me: and my concubine have they forced, that she is dead. And I took my concubine, and cut her in pieces, and sent her throughout all the country of the inheritance of Israel: for they have committed lewdness and folly in Israel.
    • ca.1909, Mark Twain, Letters from the Earth, Letter VIII:
      Solomon, who was one of the Deity's favorities, had a copulation cabinet composed of seven hundred wives and three hundred concubines.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Random House Unabridged Dictionary
  • concubine at OneLook Dictionary Search

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

concubine f (plural concubines or concubinen)

  1. concubine
    Synonyms: bijvrouw, bijwijf, bijzit, bijzitster

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

concubine f (plural concubines, masculine concubin)

  1. cohabitant (female)
  2. concubine

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

concubine f

  1. plural of concubina

LatinEdit

NounEdit

concubīne

  1. vocative singular of concubīnus

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman concubine, from Latin concubīna.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔnkiu̯ˈbiːn(ə)/

NounEdit

concubine (plural concubines)

  1. A concubine; a secondary female partner.
  2. (rare) A illegitimate or unacknowledged partner (male or female)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: concubine

ReferencesEdit