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See also: Commune

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French commune, from Medieval Latin commūnia, from Latin commūne (community, state), from commūnis (common). See also community, communion, common.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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commune (plural communes)

  1. A small community, often rural, whose members share in the ownership of property, and in the division of labour; the members of such a community.
  2. A local political division in many European countries.
  3. (obsolete) The commonalty; the common people.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) communion; sympathetic intercourse or conversation between friends
    • Tennyson
      For days of happy commune dead.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French comuner (to share), from Latin commūnis.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

commune (third-person singular simple present communes, present participle communing, simple past and past participle communed)

  1. To converse together with sympathy and confidence; to interchange sentiments or feelings; to take counsel.
    • Shakespeare
      I would commune with you of such things / That want no ear but yours.
  2. (intransitive, followed by with) To communicate (with) spiritually; to be together (with); to contemplate or absorb.
    He spent a week in the backcountry, communing with nature.
  3. To receive the communion.
    • Bishop Gilbert Burnet
      Namely, in these things, in prohibiting that none should commune alone, in making the people whole communers, or in suffering them to commune under both kinds []

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin communia, neuter plural of Latin communis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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commune f (plural communes)

  1. commune (administrative subdivision)

DescendantsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

commune

  1. feminine singular of commun

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

commune (masculine and feminine plural communi)

  1. Obsolete form of comune.

NounEdit

commune m (plural communi)

  1. Obsolete form of comune.

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

commūne

  1. nominative neuter singular of commūnis
  2. accusative neuter singular of commūnis
  3. vocative neuter singular of commūnis

ReferencesEdit

  • commune in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • commune in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “commune”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • commune” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) we know from experience: usu rerum (vitae, vitae communis) edocti sumus
    • (ambiguous) unanimously: uno, communi, summo or omnium consensu (Tusc. 1. 15. 35)
    • (ambiguous) the ordinary usage of language, everyday speech: communis sermonis consuetudo
    • (ambiguous) to be always considering what people think: multum communi hominum opinioni tribuere