commune

See also: Commune

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English commune, comune, from Old French comune, commune, from Medieval Latin commūnia, from Latin commūne (community, state), from commūnis (common). See also community, communion, common.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

commune (countable and uncountable, plural communes)

  1. A small community, often rural, whose members share in the ownership of property, and in the division of labour; the members of such a community.
    • 1975, Peter J. Seybolt, editor, The Rustication of Urban Youth in China[1], published 2015, →ISBN, LCCN 76017395, OCLC 1020152418, OL 28808561M, page 148:
      The town of Chu-chou in Hunan Province, carrying out the great directive of Chairman Mao that "educated youths must go to the villages," has put into practice factory-commune links, and under the leadership of cadres, has made a collective settlement of educated youths in commune and brigade farms, forest areas, and tea plantations.
  2. A local political division in many European countries.
  3. (obsolete) The commonalty; the common people.
  4. (uncountable, obsolete) Communion; sympathetic conversation between friends.
  5. (historical) A self-governing city or league of citizens.
    • 1997, David Nicholas, The Growth of the Medieval City: From Late Antiquity to the Early Fourteenth Century, →ISBN, page 161:
      In 1117 the commune and archbishop had separate consuls at Milan.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English communen, comunen, from Old French comunier, communier (to share), from Latin commūnico. Doublet of communicate.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

commune (third-person singular simple present communes, present participle communing, simple past and past participle communed)

  1. To converse together with sympathy and confidence; to interchange sentiments or feelings; to take counsel.
  2. (intransitive, followed by with) To communicate (with) spiritually; to be together (with); to contemplate or absorb.
    He spent a week in the backcountry, communing with nature.
  3. (Christianity, intransitive) To receive the communion.
    • 1681, Gilbert Burnet, “[A Collection of Records, and Original Papers; with Other Instruments Referred to in the Second Part of the History of the Reformation of the Church of England.] Book I.”, in The History of the Reformation of the Church of England.The Second Part, [], London: [] T[homas] H[odgkin] for Richard Chiswell, [], OCLC 1227596519, page 207:
      Namely, in these things, in prohibiting that none should commune alone, in making the People whole Communers, or in suffering them to Commune under both kinds []

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch commune, from Old French commune, from Latin [Term?].

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌkɔˈmynə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: com‧mu‧ne
  • Rhymes: -ynə

NounEdit

commune f (plural communes, diminutive communetje n)

  1. A commune (community living together with common property).

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: komune

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Medieval Latin communia, neuter plural of communis.

NounEdit

commune f (plural communes)

  1. commune (administrative subdivision)
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

commune

  1. feminine singular of commun

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

commune (plural communi)

  1. Obsolete form of comune.

NounEdit

commune m (plural communi)

  1. Obsolete form of comune.

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

commūne n (genitive commūnis); third declension

  1. joint, common or public property and rights
  2. public places and interests
  3. common feature, characteristic, general rule or terms
  4. general
  5. (Medieval Latin) league or corporation of citizens
  6. (Medieval Latin) a universal tax

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, “pure” i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative commūne commūnia
Genitive commūnis commūnium
Dative commūnī commūnibus
Accusative commūne commūnia
Ablative commūnī commūnibus
Vocative commūne commūnia

AdjectiveEdit

commūne

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of commūnis

ReferencesEdit

  • commune”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • commune”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • commune in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • commune in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) we know from experience: usu rerum (vitae, vitae communis) edocti sumus
    • (ambiguous) unanimously: uno, communi, summo or omnium consensu (Tusc. 1. 15. 35)
    • (ambiguous) the ordinary usage of language, everyday speech: communis sermonis consuetudo
    • (ambiguous) to be always considering what people think: multum communi hominum opinioni tribuere
  • Online Latin dictionary, Olivetti

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

commune

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