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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perfect passive participle of cruciō.

ParticipleEdit

cruciātus m (feminine cruciāta, neuter cruciātum); first/second declension

  1. crucified
  2. tortured

AdjectiveEdit

cruciatus (feminine cruciata, neuter cruciatum); first/second declension

  1. marked by a cross [from 12th century]

InflectionEdit

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative cruciātus cruciāta cruciātum cruciātī cruciātae cruciāta
Genitive cruciātī cruciātae cruciātī cruciātōrum cruciātārum cruciātōrum
Dative cruciātō cruciātae cruciātō cruciātīs cruciātīs cruciātīs
Accusative cruciātum cruciātam cruciātum cruciātōs cruciātās cruciāta
Ablative cruciātō cruciātā cruciātō cruciātīs cruciātīs cruciātīs
Vocative cruciāte cruciāta cruciātum cruciātī cruciātae cruciāta

NounEdit

cruciātus m (genitive cruciātūs); fourth declension

  1. torture (or the instruments of torture)
  2. torment, suffering
  3. ruin, calamity, misfortune
  4. a crusader [from 13th century]

InflectionEdit

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cruciātus cruciātūs
Genitive cruciātūs cruciātuum
Dative cruciātuī cruciātibus
Accusative cruciātum cruciātūs
Ablative cruciātū cruciātibus
Vocative cruciātus cruciātūs

Usage notesEdit

The adjective cruciatus had been used in the sense of "marked with a cross" from the 12th century; as a noun, cruciatus (often spelled with x in Middle Latin, cruxatus, croxatus, etc., also crucesignatus) was used of crusaders by the mid 13th century, from their practice of attaching a cloth cross symbol to their clothing.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit