See also: Trema and tréma

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ancient Greek τρῆμα (trêma, hole), from τετραίνω (tetraínō, perforate), used for the dots on dice, via Dutch trema and French tréma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trema (plural tremas or tremata)

  1. A diacritic consisting of two dots ( ¨ ) placed over a letter, used among other things to indicate umlaut or diaeresis.
    Synonym: diaeresis

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

trema n (plural trema's, diminutive tremaatje n)

  1. diaresis, trema

SynonymsEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tremulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trema m (plural tremas)

  1. quaking bog (place with a wet spongy ground, sometimes too soft for walking)
    Synonyms: tremedal, tremedeira, tremedoiro, tremesiña

AdjectiveEdit

trema

  1. feminine singular of tremo

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

trema (plural tremas)

  1. diaeresis

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɛ.ma/
  • Rhymes: -ɛma
  • Hyphenation: trè‧ma

VerbEdit

trema

  1. inflection of tremare:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Italian tremare, from Latin tremō.

NounEdit

trema f

  1. stage fright
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
verb

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French tréma, from Ancient Greek τρῆμα (trêma).

NounEdit

trema n (indeclinable)

  1. trema, diaeresis
    Synonym: diereza

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

trema

  1. inflection of tremo:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Further readingEdit

  • trema in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • trema in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: tre‧ma

Etymology 1Edit

From French tréma, from Ancient Greek τρῆμα (trêma, hole).

NounEdit

trema m or f (nonstandard) (plural tremas)

  1. trema, a diacritic (¨).

VerbEdit

trema

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of tremar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of tremar

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

trema

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of tremer
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of tremer
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of tremer
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of tremer

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tremō (to shake, tremble).

NounEdit

tréma f (Cyrillic spelling тре́ма)

  1. stage fright

Etymology 2Edit

From German Trema, from French tréma, from Ancient Greek τρῆμα (trêma).

NounEdit

tréma f (Cyrillic spelling тре́ма)

  1. (linguistics) diaeresis, trema
DeclensionEdit

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɾema/, [ˈt̪ɾe.ma]

VerbEdit

trema

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tremer.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tremer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tremer.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tremer.