See also: Trema and tréma

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ancient Greek τρῆμα (trêma, hole), from τετραίνω (tetraínō, perforate), used for the dots on dice, via Dutch trema and French tréma.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹɛmə/, /ˈtɹiːmə/

NounEdit

trema (plural tremas or tremata)

  1. A diacritic consisting of two dots ( ¨ ) placed over a letter, used among other things to indicate umlaut or diaeresis.
    Synonym: diaeresis

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

trema n (plural trema's, diminutive tremaatje n)

  1. diaresis, trema

SynonymsEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tremulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trema m (plural tremas)

  1. quaking bog (place with a wet spongy ground, sometimes too soft for walking)
    Synonyms: tremedal, tremedeira, tremedoiro, tremesiña

AdjectiveEdit

trema

  1. feminine singular of tremo

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

trema (plural tremas)

  1. diaeresis

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

trema

  1. third-person singular present of tremare
  2. second-person singular imperative of tremare

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology 1Edit

From French tréma, from Ancient Greek τρῆμα (trêma, hole).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trema m or f (nonstandard) (plural tremas)

  1. trema, a diacritic (¨).

VerbEdit

trema

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of tremar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of tremar

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trema

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of tremer
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of tremer
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of tremer
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of tremer

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tremō ("I shake/tremble").

NounEdit

tréma f (Cyrillic spelling тре́ма)

  1. stage fright

Etymology 2Edit

From German Trema.

NounEdit

tréma f (Cyrillic spelling тре́ма)

  1. (linguistics) diaeresis, trema

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

trema

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tremer.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tremer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tremer.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tremer.