Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

dewe

  1. Alternative form of dew

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

dewe

  1. Alternative form of dewyn

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Old French deu (due), past participle of devoir (to owe), from Latin debere (to owe), from de (from) + habere (to have).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dewe

  1. Fitting, correct, suitable; enough for some end:
    1. Expected or promoted by legislation or tradition.
    2. Required, obligated or necessary (especially as custom)
    3. Required or obligated to pay; owed or indebted.
    4. Morally correct or justified; moral, ethical.
    5. Authentic, genuine, lawful; not fake.
    6. Worthy of (a given) penalty, acclamation, or reward.
  2. Predictable, unavoidable, unpreventable.
  3. Done with care; meticulously or cautiously done.
  4. Inherent, respective, appertaining to.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: due
  • Scots: due
ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

dewe (plural dewes) (rare)

  1. Something which is fitting or appropriate for one's deeds.
  2. Something which is expected, customary or suitable.
  3. Something which one is obligated or duty-bound to do.
  4. A charge, levy, tax, payment, or due.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

ZazakiEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dewe ?

  1. (zoology) camel