See also: Justice

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English justice, from Old French justise, justice (Modern French justice), from Latin iūstitia (righteousness, equity), from iūstus (just), from iūs (right), from Proto-Italic *jowos, perhaps literally "sacred formula", a word peculiar to Latin (not general Italic) that originated in the religious cults, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-. Doublet of Justitia.

Displaced native Old English rihtwīsnes.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

justice (countable and uncountable, plural justices)

  1. The state or characteristic of being just or fair.
    the justice of a description
    • c. 1606 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene vii]:
      This even-handed justice / Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice / To our own lips.
    • 2001, David L. Lieber, Jules Harlow, Etz Hayim: Torah and Commentary, page 8:
      God recognized the justice of the moon's plea and compensated for its diminution by promising that only the moon would be seen both day and night.
  2. The ideal of fairness, impartiality, etc., especially with regard to the punishment of wrongdoing.
    Justice was served.
  3. Judgment and punishment of a party who has allegedly wronged another.
    to demand justice
  4. The civil power dealing with law.
    Ministry of Justice
    the justice system
  5. A title given to judges of certain courts; capitalized when placed before a name.
    Mr. Justice Krever presides over the appellate court
  6. Correctness, conforming to reality or rules.
    • 1726 October 28, [Jonathan Swift], “Of the Inhabitants of Lilliput; []”, in Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. [] [Gulliver’s Travels], volume I, London: [] Benj[amin] Motte, [], →OCLC, part I (A Voyage to Lilliput), pages 106–107:
      As to Perſons of Quality, they give Security to appropriate a certain Sum for each Child, ſuitable to their Condition; and theſe Funds are always managed with good Husbandry and the moſt exact Juſtice.

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Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

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Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

justice f

  1. justice
    Synonym: spravedlnost
  2. judicial system
  3. administration of justice
  4. (dated) gallows

Declension edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French justise, justice, borrowed from Latin jūstitia. Doublet of justesse.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

justice f (plural justices)

  1. justice

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Further reading edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French justise, justice, borrowed from Latin iūstitia, jūstitia (righteousness, equity), from iūstus (just), from iūs (right), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-.

Noun edit

justice f (plural justices)

  1. (Jersey) justice

Old French edit

Noun edit

justice oblique singularf (oblique plural justices, nominative singular justice, nominative plural justices)

  1. Alternative form of justise