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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

engage +‎ -er.

NounEdit

engager (plural engagers)

  1. One who, or that which, engages.
    engagers in conflicts
  2. One who enters into an engagement or agreement; a surety.
    • Wood
      Several sufficient citizens were engagers.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French engagier (to pawn, make a pledge, plight), from en- + gage (pledge), from Late Latin vadium (pledge), from Frankish *wadja (pledge), from Proto-Germanic *wadjō, *wadją (pledge, guarantee), from Proto-Indo-European *wadh- (guarantee, bail). Cognate with Middle Dutch wedde (property, pay), Old High German wetti (collateral, security agreement), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌳𐌹 (wadi), 𐍅𐌰𐌳𐌾𐌰 (wadja, guarantee), Old English wedd (pledge, vow). More at wed.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.ɡa.ʒe/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

engager

  1. to pledge, commit
  2. to hire, sign, snap up
  3. to involve
  4. to encourage
  5. to pawn
  6. (military) to enlist
  7. to enter into (as, e.g., a conversation)

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written engage- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

engager

  1. Alternative form of engagier

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. In the present tense an extra supporting e is needed in the first-person singular indicative and throughout the singular subjunctive, and the third-person singular subjunctive ending -t is lost. In addition, g becomes j before an a or an o to keep the /dʒ/ sound intact. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.